line

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Line

1. In technical analysis, a situation in which the supply and demand for a security are largely the same. A line means that the security is unlikely to see any rapid fluctuation in price. It is called a line because, when plotted on a graph, it looks like a roughly horizontal line. Technical analysts look for signals that a line is ready to break one way or another before recommending that investors take a position on a security.

2. Informal; workers in a large, industrial company. They are called the line because, historically, they assembled the parts of a product while literally standing next to each other in a long line, also called an assembly line.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

line

In technical analysis, a horizontal pattern on a price chart indicating a period during which supply and demand for a security are relatively equal. Technical analysts generally look for the price to break away from the line, at which time they are likely to take a position in the direction of the movement. See also making a line.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
They typically provide modelling and analysis tools that enable finance employees to compare targets and actuals among teams and individuals, or along product, customer, territory or time period lines. Using planning and forecasting tools, organisations are able to eliminate much of the administrative burden traditionally associated with business planning and create a 'unified view' of their organisation's strategic roadmap.
That period lines up with the driest decade in Texas since 1700, as recorded in tree rings, says Cook.
Park, in other words, saw across the early emerging period lines to these rhetorical and formally complex aspects of Charles's lyrics, and saw fit, despite Charles's borderline family connections with the English throne, to include him as one of Walpole's 'Royal Authors of England'.(15)