PEN

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PEN

The ISO 4217 currency code for the Peruvian Nuevo Sol.

PEN

ISO 4217 code for the Peruvian new sol. It was introduced in 1991, replacing the inti, which had replaced the first sol in 1985. It was issued to stem hyperinflation, which had plagued Peru in the late 1980s. Its inflation rate has historically been very low and it developed a reputation as a reliable South American currency.
References in classic literature ?
'What do you taunt me, after three hours' talk last night, with going to keep a clerk for?' repeated Mr Brass, grinning again with the pen in his mouth, like some nobleman's or gentleman's crest.
There were groups of cattle being driven to the chutes, which were roadways about fifteen feet wide, raised high above the pens. In these chutes the stream of animals was continuous; it was quite uncanny to watch them, pressing on to their fate, all unsuspicious a very river of death.
A stream of glittering fish flew into the pen from a dory alongside.
Protect him yourself, sir, with a few more strokes of that pen which has done such wonders already.
There's a gaudy big grindstone down at the mill, and we'll smouch it, and carve the things on it, and file out the pens and the saw on it, too."
White Fang came to look forward eagerly to the gathering of the men around his pen. It meant a fight; and this was the only way that was now vouchsafed him of expressing the life that was in him.
The writing-case was on her lap, with the letter and the pen lying on it.
I have always had more dread of a pen, a bottle of ink, and a sheet of paper, than of a sword or pistol."
More than once his noisy, journalistic pen brought him to prison.
"No, friend " replied Raoul, smiling, "I am obliged to you, but at this moment I want nothing but the things for which I have asked -- only I shall be very glad if the ink prove black and the pen good; upon these conditions I will pay for the pen the price of the bottle, and for the ink the price of the pie."
The two or three lines which follow contain fragments of words only, mingled with blots and scratches of the pen. The last marks on the paper bear some resemblance to the first two letters (L and A) of the name of Lady Glyde.
A braid of her hair had fallen forward as if she had been stooping over book or pen; and she stood for a moment to smooth it, and to gaze contemplatively--not in the least sentimentally--through the tall,