Rotation

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Rotation

An active asset management strategy that tactically overweighted and underweighted certain sectors, depending on expected performance. Sometimes called sector rotation.

Sector Rotation

An investment strategy in which a portfolio overweights or underweights certain sectors in accordance with expected performance. Sector rotation is a form of active investment management; the portfolio manager observes market trends and alters the composition of the portfolio in order to earn the highest possible return. Sector rotation is fairly high risk, as a portfolio's systematic overweighting and underweighting means that is not efficiently diversified. See also: Markowitz portfolio theory.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on previous research it was hypothesised that an approach angle of 45[degrees] would significantly improve kicking accuracy and ball velocity, whilst altering kick kinematics, in particular increasing pelvic rotation.
A variety of kinematic variables were chosen to identify key aspects of performance; maximum absolute ball velocity; shank abduction angle (projected onto the frontal plane), anterioposterior pelvic tilt (projected onto the sagittal plane), thigh abduction angle (projected onto the frontal plane), ankle dorsiflexion (projected onto the sagittal plane), hip flexion (projected onto the sagittal plane), knee flexion of the kicking and supporting leg (projected onto the sagittal plane); transverse pelvic rotation (about the vertical axis) and knee flexion range of motion from initiation of the kick to follow through.
Major actions in the gesturing leg and critical transition points of pelvic motion during the horizontal abduction of the leg were defined as events to facilitate the analysis: initiation of the ascending motion of the gesture leg (IAM), end of the ascending motion (EAM), initiation of the anterior pelvic tilt (IAPT), transition of the right pelvic rotation (TRPR), initiation of the descending motion of the leg (IDM), and end of the descending motion (EDM) (Fig.
Pelvic motions were quantified for the anterior and posterior tilts, left and right pelvic tilts, and right and left pelvic rotations.
The kinematic variables examined included the angle of the femoral sensor (representing flexion-extension of the thigh), lumbosacral sensor (representing pelvic rotation about the frontal plane) and thoracolumbar sensor (representing lumbar spine flexion and extension) at the catch and finish positions and at the maximum angle and position in the stroke.
The above changes in pelvic rotation were complemented by changes in lumbar rotation (lumbar spine flexion/extension).
I refused to attempt pelvic rotations, I'd had enough excitement for one day so fast forwarded to the lying down cooling off bit.