Pauper

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Pauper

A very poor person, especially one reliant on government benefits or charity. A pauper may be able to file a lawsuit without paying filing fees.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Had Marx wished to study the impact of the above-mentioned circumstances on the pauperization law, he would have noticed that not all of them are particular and changeable, i.e.
The flagrant marginalization of large segments of society, especially among the youth, coupled with the impoverishment of the middle classes and the pauperization of the popular masses, resulted in the loss of legitimacy for the state and its elites.
Lefebvre "dismissed rural industry as merely the agency of further pauperization" and characterized the peasant desire for land as a timeless obsession.
The history of the post-colonial world is disfigured by one-party tyrannies, rapacious oligarchies, social dislocation caused by Western "investments," and large-scale pauperization brought about by famine, civil war, or outright robbery.
The conspicuously luxurious lifestyle of the new rich against the background of the catastrophic pauperization of the masses was a sort of challenge: The "plebeians" should know their place.
Their misuse of power results in the weakening of the system and the pauperization of the people.
The government should have shown greater alertness in dealing with the basic problem that caused the agitation - the increasing pauperization of the farmer.
Widespread pauperization and vulnerability of millions of families across the Arab world took hold in the mid-1980s.
This could lead to pauperization of the population through purchasing power loss and an increase in interest rates which leads to recession.
Marx saw unemployment and pauperization as fundamental to the working of capitalism and called it the absolute general law of capitalist accumulation.
Not least, Jews were undergoing massive pauperization in the late nineteenth century, and this put Jewish society under great cultural stress.