Pauper

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Pauper

A very poor person, especially one reliant on government benefits or charity. A pauper may be able to file a lawsuit without paying filing fees.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, Tocqueville thought that pauperism caused public charity to inherit all the evils of medieval monasteries, but at the same time, lacking the latter's morality.
We have already added here a similar law of motion for the movement in and out of the stagnant segment of the labor market which therefore assumes that there are ways to leave the sphere of pauperism. Yet the downward leading coefficients [[gamma].sup.d.sub.1], [[gamma].sup.d.sub.2] will be significantly larger than the upward leading ones [[gamma].sup.u.sub.1], [[gamma].sup.u.sub.2].
If you recall, Rush gaming abandoned its initial Massachusetts proposal to site the parlor in Worcester when it became evident that the quickest path to pauperism for a billionaire is to horse-trade with Worcester politicians.
A persistent abhorrence for the English Poor Laws and fear of pauperism, as well as a loathing of asylums, drove early interventions in welfare, along with the old moral and social divisions between deserving and undeserving, and the inclusions and exclusions (most particularly of Aboriginal people and Asians).
Dugdale's 1877 book, "The Jukes": A Study in Crime, Pauperism, Disease and Heredity, Arthur Estabrook's update, The Jukes in 1915, and Henry Goddard's The Kallikak Family: A Study in the Heredity of Feeble-Mindedness (1912).
Temperance advocates, however, discouraged the provision of alcohol for paupers drunkenness being seen as a cause of pauperism. Partly as a result, the mechanics institutes --established in the early nineteenth century-offered 'rational recreation' at Christmas in the form of lectures and books on old Christmas customs.
widespread pauperism, which meant that a large parr of the population
The annual reports of the Society for the Prevention of Pauperism (later the Society for the Reformation of Juvenile Delinquents), as well as the writings of the members of the New York Free School Society (later the New York Public School Society), suggest the connection between education and juvenile justice reformers in nineteenth-century New York City.
Of particular interest in this chapter is Riall's discussion of the system of order and control to regulate pauperism and crime in both cities and the countryside.
In Along the archival grain, these arguments are most clearly developed in Chapters 4 and 5, where Stoler examines the musings of colonial authorities on suitable career paths for Indies-born Europeans and investigates official inquiries into Indo-European pauperism on Java.
(Stuart Reid's explanation is that he wasn't much of a Christian in any event.) William Cobbett argues that Henry VIII's expropriation of the Catholic Church's land and other ecclesiastical property wrecked the balanced structure of society that had made and maintained England as the most prosperous and contented country in Europe, and within a handful of years introduced pauperism where it had never before been known.
England prospered in the nineteenth century but pauperism grew alongside.