paternalism

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paternalism

an approach to the management of employees or subordinates in which considerable importance is attached to looking after their interests as viewed and defined by the employer or superior. Paternalism is often associated with hostility to TRADE UNIONS since unions attempt to give independent expression to employee interests. See MANAGEMENT STYLE, WELFARE.

paternalism

the belief that individuals are not the best judges of their own interests and that the government is better able to determine the policies that are most appropriate to serve the interests of the public. Paternalism provides a justification for CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES.

Compare SELF-INTEREST.

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To understand the libertarian paternalist project, then, one must have some sense of what those purported frailties are.
Traditional paternalists have no trouble simply inserting their own preferences into the regulations, though it's generally unclear why their preferences, applied across a general population, should be considered superior to people's individual choices.
The new paternalists claim to have identified just such a set of
In this way, coercive paternalists discount a person's ability to choose accurately and appropriately, restrictive choice architecture notwithstanding (p.
In the final chapter, White emphasizes that nudges can by varying degrees raise the cost of behaving in ways that libertarian paternalists consider imprudent.
because long-term costs are not salient), means paternalists might take
slaveowners as seigniorial paternalists, arguing that Southern
One suspects that this is the case with regard to many morally-charged behaviors in which paternalists take an interest.
Old-fashioned paternalists have always been very well aware of this.
Mistaken "paternalists" who act from a distance toward the subject--who incorrectly presume to understand the subject's good better than she does in a given instance--turn out to do more harm than good, all things considered.
What grounds have those New Paternalists for thinking that the non-working poor really (in their hearts of hearts) want to work, but just cannot bring themselves to do so?
He portrays slaveholders as paternalists, yet much of his evidence demonstrates their capitalistic inclinations, including their willingness to prod slave laborers with physical coercion.