paternalism

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paternalism

an approach to the management of employees or subordinates in which considerable importance is attached to looking after their interests as viewed and defined by the employer or superior. Paternalism is often associated with hostility to TRADE UNIONS since unions attempt to give independent expression to employee interests. See MANAGEMENT STYLE, WELFARE.

paternalism

the belief that individuals are not the best judges of their own interests and that the government is better able to determine the policies that are most appropriate to serve the interests of the public. Paternalism provides a justification for CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES.

Compare SELF-INTEREST.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Paternalistic arguments cannot be replaced readily by claims about harm to others.
These defenses attempt to show that paternalism is generally self-defeating, autonomy-diminishing, productive of more harm than good, etc, and that is why we should not have paternalistic laws or policies.
By contrast, the new paternalistic schools are animated more by obligation than freedom.
It can become a bit of a prototype of what we expect out of leadership going forward, and the paternalistic leadership style kind of resembles that of a parent," Tsai said.
It was also a paternalistic sentiment that drove Brad Weatherly, director, retirement benefits for Baylor Scott & White Health to initiate a change in the health system’s loan payback policy.
The basic idea in this article is that in some sense it is more paternalistic to make policy assuming that the consistent choosers are making a mistake than it is to make policy assuming that the inconsistent choosers are doing so.
Research Question 1: Does paternalistic leadership affect college English teachers' teaching efficacy?
In particular, they endeavor "to see if they could successfully meet what might be thought of as the John Stuart Mill challenge: are there circumstances in which the individual's own good is sufficient warrant to justify a paternalistic intervention?" They define government paternalism, describe conditions under which they believe it is justified, and present three potential scenarios for paternalism.
The second common theory of paternalism focuses on the distinctive intention behind paternalistic interference.
This paper refines each of his three conditions, ultimately providing an improved definition of paternalistic interference.
One is that nudging by shaming can be either paternalistic or non-paternalistic and that, like any intervention, it is easier to justify when it is nonpaternalistic.
In addition, Alitalia's labour force knows that about 2,000 of its total 12,500 employees will lose their jobs, which is hard to achieve in the paternalistic and heavily unionised Italian corporate culture.