paternalism

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paternalism

an approach to the management of employees or subordinates in which considerable importance is attached to looking after their interests as viewed and defined by the employer or superior. Paternalism is often associated with hostility to TRADE UNIONS since unions attempt to give independent expression to employee interests. See MANAGEMENT STYLE, WELFARE.

paternalism

the belief that individuals are not the best judges of their own interests and that the government is better able to determine the policies that are most appropriate to serve the interests of the public. Paternalism provides a justification for CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES.

Compare SELF-INTEREST.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Nudges are consistent choice paternalistic when the arguments used to support them are based on presumptions about the preferences of the consistent decision-makers that disregard the actual, observed choices of the people in that group.
If a large portion of the work force is eligible for a defined benefit (DB) plan, the plan sponsor may tend to be less paternalistic with its defined contribution (DC) plan.
Social exchange theory and norms of reciprocity have been used to develop a framework to explain the relationship between direct supervisors' paternalistic leadership behavior and college English teachers' teaching efficacy (Thibaut & Kelley, 1959).
After reviewing the academic literature on paternalism, the authors "conclude that a government intervention is paternalistic with respect to an individual if it is intended to address a failure of judgment by that individual [and] further the individual's own good.
This understanding of paternalism's normative significance provides the tools to make the charge of paternalism leveled against some policies intelligible, and conversely to explain why other paternalistic policies are permissible.
When a paternalistic approach is applied to workfare, the resultant policy could be called paternalistic workfare.
It is evident that the military is hoping to restore a paternalistic state in Egypt, with support from Saudi Arabia and other Gulf states.
While Huxley's brave new world shows the horror of living in an entirely paternalistic society, it is not necessarily the case that his readers have a problem with paternalism.
conclusive objection against all paternalistic legislation, prima facie
These measures may indeed convey a strong message about the putative value of "healthy living," but it is less clear that they are paternalistic in a morally problematic sense.
Yet above all, these schools share a trait that has been largely ignored by education researchers: They are paternalistic institutions.
These defenses attempt to show that paternalism is generally self-defeating, autonomy-diminishing, productive of more harm than good, etc, and that is why we should not have paternalistic laws or policies.