paternalism

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paternalism

an approach to the management of employees or subordinates in which considerable importance is attached to looking after their interests as viewed and defined by the employer or superior. Paternalism is often associated with hostility to TRADE UNIONS since unions attempt to give independent expression to employee interests. See MANAGEMENT STYLE, WELFARE.

paternalism

the belief that individuals are not the best judges of their own interests and that the government is better able to determine the policies that are most appropriate to serve the interests of the public. Paternalism provides a justification for CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES.

Compare SELF-INTEREST.

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Perhaps the classic example of a libertarian paternalist nudge is switching the default rule on participation in employer-sponsored savings plans--401Ks, etc.
The inclusion of the last Romanian leader among the 'signposts' of nostalgic memories was the result of two reasons: his leadership of almost 25 years represented for the majority of nostalgics a consistent part of their life and also a period when they enjoyed a limited economic prosperity under the care of the paternalist state.
But the new paternalists need to ask whether protecting people from wasting a bit of money on an impulse purchase or from the consequences of failing to read a contract carefully are worth the long-term costs of those protections.
the benefits of paternalist policies, but can neither quantify those
Conly mentions that "the hard paternalist may impose actions the agent would not want even if aware of the facts.
Mark White spends little time reviewing specific policy proposals that libertarian paternalists have advanced and instead challenges the moral foundations of the entire research program.
the paternalist thinks would make choosers' lives go well.
Deceptively open, then, the discourse surrounding the show cast the audience as enthralled by either nostalgia for paternalist models of authority or the cultural shorthand of Twitter.
Dickens's employment of a servant figure as the most ardent guardian of a paternalist world-view can be located in the revival of a strong paternalist ideology in England between the late eighteenth and the mid nineteenth centuries.
The wall of pedantry, buttressed by generations of paternalist traditions, was too high and unassailable.
They attempted to develop alternatives beyond the repressive choices of the paternalist welfare-capitalist state or the autocratic, Leninist state.
voluntary individual choices, the paternalist who seeks merely to