paternalism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to paternalism: medical paternalism

paternalism

an approach to the management of employees or subordinates in which considerable importance is attached to looking after their interests as viewed and defined by the employer or superior. Paternalism is often associated with hostility to TRADE UNIONS since unions attempt to give independent expression to employee interests. See MANAGEMENT STYLE, WELFARE.

paternalism

the belief that individuals are not the best judges of their own interests and that the government is better able to determine the policies that are most appropriate to serve the interests of the public. Paternalism provides a justification for CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES.

Compare SELF-INTEREST.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
There is a third, but related, reason to reject an intent-based account of the wrongness of paternalism. Paternalism often applies most pointedly to actions for which it is difficult to ascribe any definite intention.
In a sense, soft paternalism can infantilize its citizens by preventing such learning, and reduce liberty in the process.
A key feature of the proposed distinction between quasi-paternalism and consistent choice paternalism is that it provides a way for traditional anti-paternalist concerns to inform decisions about choice architecture.
When someone else makes choices for an individual in this manner, we may speak of paternalism. Paternalistic intervention is presumably in the interest of the individual (see, e.g., Clarke, 2002; Dworkin, 1972; Le Grand & New, 2015).
However, even putting these concerns aside, this paternalism poses the same concerns as traditional paternalism: specifically, a retardation of an individual's capacity to learn from his mistakes.
The shift in white racial paternalism that Everett's texts imagine may not itself enact real change in the region, but it does create an imaginary landscape within which regional progress is possible.
Is it because using the tax system would make this paternalism look less soft?
Keown and Goodman consider the ethical aspects of upayakausalya in relation to issues of paternalism and potential for misapplication by teachers claiming to be bodhisattvas, which raises a need for defence of upaya-kausalya.
(I shall say a good deal about what the word "require" might mean in this setting.) Default rules tend to be "sticky," and can therefore greatly influence ultimate outcomes; for this reason, they might seem to be a form of objectionable paternalism. For those who reject paternalism and who prize freedom of choice, active choosing has evident appeal.
This article analyses a particular characteristic of workfare in Australia, namely paternalism. Contrary to past research (Deacon 1994; White 2000), paternalism is not a policy rationale, that is, it is not merely the reason for a particular policy.
Vanderburg offers a close analysis of persistent culture of Southern paternalism, concentrating on the history of Cannon Mills textile company.
His two main arguments against libertarian paternalism appeal to the epistemic limitations of planners and to the ethical problem of giving governmental authorities the power to use information about people's cognitive biases to manipulate their choices.