partition

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partition

The division of real property into separate parcels for joint owners who no longer wish to own the property together.If possible,a court must physically divide the property into shares of equal value and quality.If not possible,the court will order a sale of the property with the proceeds to be split among the owners.Partition actions are encountered most often when an owner of real property dies without a will but with several heirs.If they cannot agree on a disposition of the property, it will be partitioned. In the alternative, investors will often buy an undivided interest from a minority heir for very little money and then petition a court for partition.Usually the investor will be able to buy the property at the partition auction, because none of the other owners can afford to purchase the whole.The strategy is not intended to obtain a bargain price for property,because the court will usually order an appraisal and prohibit any owner from buying at a price less than the appraised value. Rather, the practice is intended to force property onto the market even though some or most of the other owners have no desire to sell.

References in periodicals archive ?
The weight of vertices is used by METIS-based Partitioner to calculate the load for each partition and make it balanced, while the weight of edges is used to determine the validity of cutting an edge(s) in order to split a partition and make new partitions execute in parallel.
Finally, the partitioner aims to provide guidance about the signals which should not be multiplexed since they affect the critical path.
However, in applications, the computational domain is finite, and the decomposition is often given according to physical properties of the underlying model or by a mesh partitioner, and thus, in many applications, subdomains are of various shapes and sizes.
Typically, the matrices [S.sub.i] are constructed from (larger) subdomain finite element stiffness matrices [A.sub.i] based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition (e.g., using a graph partitioner) by the (formal) static condensation of non-shared dofs.
In a domain decomposition frame-work, we typically begin by subdividing the problem into p parts with the help of a graph partitioner [6, 7, 17, 21, 30, 33].
They include results for cubic subdomains as well as subdomains obtained by a mesh partitioner. Different distributions for the coefficients are also considered with constant coefficients, highly random values, and channel distributions.
This example is used to demonstrate that the performance of the algorithm need not diminish significantly when a mesh partitioner is used to decompose the mesh.
It is impractical to enhance the hypergraph partitioner to enforce the full row rank in the blocks.
For instance, experiments with rowwise partitioning by the HCM variant of their partitioner PaToH [6] on a set of square, structurally nonsymmetric matrices show for p = 64, on average, a scaled volume of 0.92 and a maximum scaled volume per processor of 0.025 (only counting the sends, not the receives), which is not too far from the theoretical optimum of 0.0143.