Partisan

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Partisan

Describing any measure or policy that draws support from only one political party. For example, in the United States, a bill drawing support only from Democrats or only from Republicans may be said to be partisan. The term can also be used to describe to the act of rigidly supporting only the interests of one's own party.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of Hazlitt's pet theories was that humans were simply wired for animosity, and he mentioned partisanship among other examples of what he saw as a basic biological tendency to savor a grudge.
Likewise, voters' opinion of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election is colored by partisanship. Overall, 34 percent approve and 40 percent disapprove of his work.
However, unlike the divisive partisanship we see between Labour and Conservative supporters in the UK, or the Democrats and Republicans in the US, the Pakistani brand of partisanship (specifically the PML-N vs PTI tedium) is a slightly bewildering phenomenon, given its relative lack of grounding in any ideological or programmatic difference.
What if partisanship itself impacts individual attitudes about religion?
(Among Democrats, strong partisanship rose from 34 to 48 percent.
The Article proposes a new approach focused on legitimate state interest and partisan purpose, building on a constitutional norm against government partisanship. The importance of consolidating and reifying this norm, in its most salient legal context, cannot be overstated at a time when hyperpolarization between the major parties dominates national politics and is at its most severe in our lifetime.
Those interests, of course, have grown more diverse than Jefferson or any of the other founders could have imagined, and the dream of moving beyond partisanship has been long abandoned.
Synopsis: For the first time in the eight years of assessing partisanship at the state level, Gallup finds more Republican (20) than Democratic states (14).
In a series of tweets, Jumblatt criticized the Taif agreement in its current form by saying it privileged partisanship over competence.
Barack Obama's startling four-year ascent from the Illinois state senate to the White House was propelled in large measure by his skill in discerning and addressing this widespread aversion to partisanship, most famously in a 2004 Democratic convention keynote address about transcending the divisions between "red" and "blue" America.
One of which is that government should fine-tune political partisanship -- disagreements about how government should behave.
In a polarized political environment, allegations of excessive partisanship by public actors are ubiquitous.