Partisan

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Partisan

Describing any measure or policy that draws support from only one political party. For example, in the United States, a bill drawing support only from Democrats or only from Republicans may be said to be partisan. The term can also be used to describe to the act of rigidly supporting only the interests of one's own party.
References in periodicals archive ?
1) The routine, historical entanglement of partisanship with redistricting long discouraged courts from entertaining constitutional claims against partisan gerrymandering.
The Democrats, who played their own game of "gotcha" through the years, had a hand in creating the extreme partisanship that is now blowing up the system through the rise and resilience of Trump.
He distinguishes "low" partisanship, which focuses on "strategy, power, and ultimately, victory," from the "high" form, "oriented to convictions, principles, and conceptions of the common interest.
Now, partisanship is surely healthy: People have different political goals and sensibilities; like-minded people cluster; we call these clusters political parties; in our two-party system, their polarity defines the competition for power.
Moreover, the failure to understand partisanship impairs our ability to confront the partisanship we care about most.
Purchasing power, partisanship and local issues may lead to a result which some opinion pollsters would have ruled out as impossible.
This triangle is here defined as the civic, or 'bright', or integrative aspects of partisanship.
Before describing the approach I use to measure the level of partisan voting in a given election, it is important to provide a bit of background on parties and partisanship in the United States.
examine the exogeneity of economic perceptions in macropolitical analysis and the role partisanship might play in shaping these perceptions.
With all the partisanship and gridlock here in Washington, it's easy to wonder if such unity is really possible," Obama said.
Congress is riven with partisanship and intransigence.
Huckabee expressed distaste for the partisanship he sees in Washington, D.