Bracket

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Bracket

A term signifying the extent of an underwriter's commitment in a new issue, e.g., major bracket or minor bracket.

Bracket

A group of underwriters responsible for placing a certain amount of a new issue with investors. Brackets are arranged in a hierarchy, which indicates how much of an issue each bracket is placing with respect to the others. The brackets are called, from largest to smallest: bulge bracket, major bracket, minor bracket, underwriter, selling group. The second largest bracket is sometimes called the mezzanine bracket. Brackets are listed in order of size on an advertisement detailing each new issue, known as the tombstone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Even in the case of large formulas, the delimiter produced by DynMath retains the form of a parenthesis (see Figure 5).
Notice that unlike in the previous poem where the parenthesis coincided with and thus reinforced an already existing strong syntactical break, here the opening parenthesis enforces a break between the main part of the sentence and its modifying participial phrase, playing a much more salient role in parsing the poem and marking a conceptual separateness.
In a brief "conclusion" (171-74) Zewi emphasises that the definition and identification of parenthesis are elusive from a linguistic point of view, and so one needs to employ in particular functional-pragmatic and literary analysis.
Find the first open parenthesis of type p belonging to [S.sub.u].
The different parties came together with Parenthesis staff at the company's studios based at Coventry Canal Basin in order to share and discuss ideas about their work.
The box-office figures are expressed in millions in parenthesis.
(1.) There is a very strange echo of this scene in a line from David Jones's In Parenthesis, where The Queen of the Wood decorates the dead with wild-flowers: "Emil has a curious crown, it's made of golden saxifrage" (185).
The Malorian texture of In Parenthesis presents the destruction of the Round Table as analogy for the destruction of fellowship on the western front, but Jones recognizes the ironic distance between contemporary combat and medieval romance through fragmented allusion and startling juxtaposition.
This article argues that the interaction between femininity and nature in chapter 4 of the novel is flawed, and that it is necessary to look into "Parenthesis" to ascertain whether such a situation can ultimately be revoked.
The author has a distinct propensity for parenthesis (including parentheses within parentheses) and for shifting from one level of discourse to another without transition.
Here are the verbatim responses to the question about specific challenges (with suggested actions in parenthesis):