exposure

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Risk

The uncertainty associated with any investment. That is, risk is the possibility that the actual return on an investment will be different from its expected return. A vitally important concept in finance is the idea that an investment that carries a higher risk has the potential of a higher return. For example, a zero-risk investment, such as a U.S. Treasury security, has a low rate of return, while a stock in a start-up has the potential to make an investor very wealthy, but also the potential to lose one's entire investment. Certain types of risk are easier to quantify than others. To the extent that risk is quantifiable, it is generally calculated as the standard deviation on an investment's average return.

exposure

see EXCHANGE RATE EXPOSURE.

exposure

(1) In finance,the amount that one may lose in an investment;the potential loss,which could be the capital invested plus any personal liability on loans in excess of the value of the property securing the loans. (2) In the market, the process of making a property known to the marketplace as available for sale or lease.(3) Physically, the direction of an improvement;for example,“The southern exposure of the house had all the best views.”

References in periodicals archive ?
* In a final study, one (2.4%) of forty-two workers with accidental parenteral exposure to infected blood or serum and one (0.3%) of 294 health care workers without parenteral exposure were seropositive.
According to Nisar N et al., only 3.3% students consider medical students as high risk group.4 Literature also tells that about half of the students do not know about needle stick safety3 despite the fact that the risk of transmission of blood borne infection after a needle stick injur y is significantly worrisome, since the risk of contracting HBV after parenteral exposure is 30 percent.5
Study subjects were divided into 4 groups of approximately equal size (n = 11-13, Table 1): 1) injection drug users (IDUs) without HIV infection (all positive for antibodies to HCV when testing was available); 2) Men who had sex with men (MSM) with AIDS without a history of parenteral exposure (all negative for antibodies to HCV when testing was available); 3) IDUs infected with HIV with AIDS-defining illnesses; and 4) IDUs infected with HIV who died of other causes while presymptomatic.