Child

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Child

For tax purposes, the term child includes the taxpayer's son, duaghter, stepchild, eligible foster child, or a descedant of any of them, or an adopted child. It also includes the taxpayer's brother, sister, half brother, half sister, stepbrother, stepsister, or a descendant of any of them.
References in periodicals archive ?
3 SociaL interaction While parents can play alongside their child, it's likely deeper learning comes from socially interactive parent-child play.
Applying the inclusion criteria above, an additional 25 articles were excluded: 21 did not include the facilitators or barriers to parent-child communication; two included only communication with healthcare provider; one included discussion of facilitators or barriers to parent-child communication, but from healthcare provider perspectives; and one focused on communication related to participating in clinical trials.
This was not the full extent of parent-child aggression recorded by the researchers, however, the team found that parent-child aggression occurred much more frequently on its own than it did in association with interparental aggression.
However, there are few studies on the perceptual differences of family functioning and the parent-child relationship among different family members; and studies analyzing these factors in family with a depressed adolescent member are few as well.
The parent-child bonding sessions at The Spa are the latest additions to the hotel's dedicated programme of family activities.
In Pakistan, few researches have been conducted in past decades which measured parent-child relationships directly or indirectly.
Positive parent-child relationships provide the foundation for children's learning.
When asked about the case, Carrie Cohen, an attorney at Morrison & Foerster who formerly was a federal prosecutor in the SDNY, said that from a legal point of view parent-child privilege--which has a very narrow use--"doesn't come into play in this case."
As children come to the workshops with their parents, parent-child relationships are strengthened, children feel more secure as they feel the support of their parents, children are more emotionally healthy, self-confident, able to explore more and acquire a deeper learning.
In addition to positive parent-child interactions that affect children's language development, there are parent to child variables e.g.
Parent and child report questionnaires were completed by 64 parent-child dyads (ages 8-18) with a child diagnosed with DM1.

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