deficit

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Related to oxygen deficit: oxygen debt

Deficit

An excess of liabilities over assets, of losses over profits, or of expenditure over income.

Deficit

A situation in which outflow of money exceeds inflow. That is, a deficit occurs when a government, company, or individual spends more than he/she/it receives in a given period of time, usually a year. One's deficit adds to one's debt, and, therefore, many analysts believe that deficits are unsustainable over the long-term. See also: Surplus.

deficit

1. A negative retained earnings balance. A deficit results when the accumulated losses and dividend payments of a business exceed its earnings.

deficit

see BUDGET DEFICIT, BALANCE OF PAYMENTS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Under normal circumstances the blood supplies enough oxygen to the liver, but if hepatocytes use up more oxygen because of the breakdown of alcohol, oxygen deficits (i.
Oxygen deficit is related to the exercise time to exhaustion at maximal aerobic speed in middle distance runners.
2]/running speed regression does not improve the precision of Accumulated Oxygen Deficit estimation in endurance-trained runners.
This switch was believed to be due to an oxygen deficit, but is now understood to be related to mitochondrial shuttle saturation.
While this temporarily solves the tumor's oxygen deficit, Folkman notes, the leaky plumbing permits blood plasma to empty into the areas between the cells.
The laboratory investigation suggests that administration of a perfluorocarbon with the characteristics and performance of Oxycyte combined with 100% oxygen therapy can reverse tissue oxygen deficit and holds promise for reducing ischemic injury," said Bruce D.
Currently, the maximum accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) is considered the gold standard to estimate anaerobic capacity (15).
Fourth, oxygen deficit leads to oxidosis, which impedes tissue oxygenation.
A new study supports a growing but controversial body of evidence that sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, is the deadly culmination of an underlying disease characterized by a chronic oxygen deficit.
The true issue here is oxygen deficit and not carbon excess.
In considering current climatic changes and extinction of species, there is an inexplicable silence among biologists and geoscientists about the effects of oxygen deficit during major geological upheavals of past eras.