deficit

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Deficit

An excess of liabilities over assets, of losses over profits, or of expenditure over income.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Deficit

A situation in which outflow of money exceeds inflow. That is, a deficit occurs when a government, company, or individual spends more than he/she/it receives in a given period of time, usually a year. One's deficit adds to one's debt, and, therefore, many analysts believe that deficits are unsustainable over the long-term. See also: Surplus.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

deficit

1. A negative retained earnings balance. A deficit results when the accumulated losses and dividend payments of a business exceed its earnings.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

deficit

see BUDGET DEFICIT, BALANCE OF PAYMENTS.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Under normal circumstances the blood supplies enough oxygen to the liver, but if hepatocytes use up more oxygen because of the breakdown of alcohol, oxygen deficits (i.e., hypoxia) can develop in some liver areas.
Oxygen deficit: a measure of the anaerobic energy production during intense exercise?
The reality is that when careful measurements are done assessing the pO2 (oxygen level) of the myocardial cells during an MI, to the huge surprise of many, there is no oxygen deficit ever shown in an evolving MI.
(2005) Inclusion of exercise intensities above the lactate threshold in V[O.sub.2]/running speed regression does not improve the precision of Accumulated Oxygen Deficit estimation in endurance-trained runners.
Maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) proposed by Medbo and colleagues (18) is considered the gold standard test for anaerobic capacity.
Fourth, oxygen deficit leads to oxidosis, which impedes tissue oxygenation.
A new study supports a growing but controversial body of evidence that sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, is the deadly culmination of an underlying disease characterized by a chronic oxygen deficit. The finding strengthens the possibility that a biochemical "marker" might be found to identify infants at highest risk.
Currently, the maximum accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD) is considered the gold standard to estimate anaerobic capacity (15).
The true issue here is oxygen deficit and not carbon excess.
In considering current climatic changes and extinction of species, there is an inexplicable silence among biologists and geoscientists about the effects of oxygen deficit during major geological upheavals of past eras.
Alcohol metabolism leads to hepatic oxygen deficits, adducts and ROS formation, and interaction between alcohol metabolites.