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Own

To have the exclusive right to use and abuse property within the limits of the law. For example, if one owns land, the owner may use it to build a house, start a farm or dump toxic waste, subject to zoning, environmental and other applicable laws. The ability of an individual to own something is the foundation of the free market system.
References in periodicals archive ?
1298(a)(3), it is treated as owning its proportionate share of the stock owned directly or indirectly by FP (i.e.,US1 owns 30% of G1).
Some form of an antidividend stripping rule is necessary to deal with the situation where the owning members retain some stock of the former subsidiary member.
person that holds an option to acquire foreign company stock is treated as owning the stock subject to the option for purposes of determining' whether the option holder is a U.S.
For tax years beginning before 1997, an S corporation was prohibited from owning 80% or more of another corporation's stock.
Had M and P purchased the residence as tenants in common, with M owning 44.45% ($200,000/$450,000) and P owning 55.55% ($250,000/$450,000), both M and P could have deferred their entire gains.
303 are not limited to taxpayers owning interests in closely held corporations, but could also be used when the stock is widely held and publicly traded.
Owning 80% of the voting power or value of each class of stock is not necessary.
[] Dividends Reduced from 10% to 5% on dividends paid to a corporation owning at least 10% or more of the voting stock of the payer, unless the payer is a Canadian nonresident-owned investment corporation, a regulated investment company (RIC) or a real estate investment trust (REIT).
Under the constructive ownership rules, Martina is treated as owning an additional 50% of Land Racket - the 37.5% owned by her brothers and sister (Ivan, Boris and Chrissy), and the 12.5% owned by her spouse (Jimmy).
318(a)(4) can treat a nonshareholder as owning shares or treat a shareholder as owning more shares than he actually owns.