overtrade


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Overtrade

1. To make both buy and sell orders through different brokers to create the impression of increased interest in a security and thereby raise the price. This is a form of price manipulation and is forbidden by the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. It is less formally known as churning.

2. In brokering, to make more trades on a client's holdings than are necessary in order to maximize commissions. Overtrading is illegal.

overtrade

1. To purchase a client's securities at an above-the-market price in return for the client's purchase of part of a new issue.
2. See churn.
References in periodicals archive ?
A spokeswoman for the CCG said: "We have agreed a fixed cash sum contract this year so will not pay for any overtrade.'' Documents reveal the CCG is also experiencing a further PS250,000 of contract 'pressure' following higher activity than planned with Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, BMI private hospital and the Yorkshire Ambulance Service, which operates the 111 service.
For example, I expect our restructuring team's advice relating to cash management and working capital requirements will continue to be in demand but the focus may change from cash conservation to avoiding the temptation to overtrade.
The right of governments to intervene and regulate in order to achieve food sovereignty must be reinstated and the Right to Food prevails overtrade agreements.
A quarter of the 2000 companies assessed have seen their profits slump, and in an attempt to retain sales, 737 have already started to overtrade, selling at a loss.
Yet if there should be a reaction in business caus'd by overtrade & Speculation, which there doubtless will the man with a good trade stands a far superior chance to one without, therefore if you intend to come to L do not delay till fall, but come immediately & you will be far more likely to obtain employment.
Don't overtrade. In boom times do not overstretch yourself.
"It doesn't matter if the customer doesn't know" (Steve Brown, Perfiliate Technologies), "Don't overtrade" (Michele Finch, The Old Fashioned Football Shirt Company), "Ask a lawyer" (Peter Huntley, Go North East), "Just say 'yes'" (architect Tim Bailey) and "They'll never close the brewery" (Frank Nicholson, the last ever boss of Vaux Breweries).
The one thing I will never do with this business is overtrade it because then I won't be giving a proper service.
A potted guide in how not to do it: "It doesn't matter if the customer doesn't know" (Steve Brown, Perfiliate Technologies), "Don't overtrade" (Michele Finch, The Old Fashioned Football Shirt Company), "Ask a lawyer" (Peter Huntley, Go North East), "Just say 'yes'" (architect Tim Bailey) and "They'll never close the brewery" (Frank Nicholson, the last ever boss of Vaux Breweries).