overtime

(redirected from overtimes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Overtime

Work by a wage earner in excess of a statutory number or hours. For example, any time that a waged employee works over 40 hours in a week is usually considered overtime. Working overtime may entitle an employee to extra compensation, such as one and a half times his/her ordinary wage, which is often called time-and-a-half.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

overtime

extra hours of work undertaken by an employee that are additional to the number of hours specified as constituting the ‘basic’ working week, and for which employees are paid a WAGE RATE higher than the ‘basic’ wage. Firms often resort to overtime working to meet sudden increases in orders, viewing overtime by the existing workforce as a more flexible and cheaper alternative to taking on extra workers. An overtime ban by employees can thus be a highly effective form of INDUSTRIAL ACTION.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

overtime

the hours of work that are additional to those formally agreed with the labour force as constituting the basic working week. Employers resort to overtime working to meet sudden increases in business activity, viewing overtime by the existing labour force as a more flexible alternative to taking on extra workers. Overtime pay rates can be two to three times basic hourly rate. See PAY.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Overtime period four saw DeJesus score from the 3 and add the conversion rush, while Murdock fullback Chad Jandris tallied from the 3 and a conversion rush by Ard deadlocked it at 34-34.
The fifth overtime produced more of the same as Lorion scored from a yard out, but the conversion rush was stopped.
Finally, something gave in the sixth overtime period.
overtime games -- three -- pale in comparison, both occurring in 2006.
Indeed, there is evidence that, despite the short-term benefits that make overtime attractive to employers (Easton and Rossin 1997), it may in the longer term create offsetting harm to an organization by decreasing quality, increasing mistakes (Babbar and Aspelin 1998; Hirschman 2000), and reducing productivity (Shepard and Clifton 2000).
Overtime work and the crowding-out of non-work-time activities
Overtime, and in particular forced overtime without advanced notice, is a challenge to working families.