Overreaching

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Related to overreach: Overwatch, prioritise, aligned, Yester

Overreaching

Used in the context of general equities. Creating artificial volume in a stock through activity not generated by normal/natural buyers and sellers in the market.

Overreaching

1. The process by which ownership of one asset is changed into ownership of another asset. For example, one may own a car and then sell it. Afterward, one owns the cash from the sale. The process by which this occurs is called overreaching.

2. The act of buying and/or selling a security repeatedly such that the trading volume goes to an artificially high level. If one overreaches as part of a price manipulation scheme, it is illegal.
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Bush's decision in 2003 to invade Iraq to finish off Saddam Hussein is the costliest overreach of US military power since Vietnam --an indelible warning not to repeat in Iran that calamitous debacle.
It also overreaches in text in other areas." Deputy leader Mr Dodds said it was "somewhat ironic to talk about wanting to remove any checks between the border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic, and then for the EU to suggest setting up checks and a harder border between one part of the United Kingdom and another part of the United Kingdom".
It is thought his overreach came at the next obstacle and soon afterwards Coneygree lost his action and was pulled up by his rider, Nico de Boinville.
The risible overreach of this law — no Egyptian Arabic on billboards?
The Clean Power Plan is an unprecedented overreach of the EPA's authority under the Clean Air Act, as noted in the congressional disapproval of the rule that passed in the House and Senate with strong majorities."
The 10-year-old suffered an overreach and was pulled up before the fifth-last fence when attempting to register back-to-victories in the Coral Welsh Grand National.
'"Waters of the U.S.' is pure and simple regulatory overreach that is not supported by the law, judicial precedence or science."
5078, the Waters of the United States Regulatory Overreach Protection Act of 2014.
The Devil Inside the Beltway: The Shocking Expose of the US Government's Surveillance and Overreach into Cybersecurity, Medicine and Small Business is a true-life spy story that reads like an Orwellian dystopia.
House of Representatives passed the Waters of the United States Regulatory Overreach Protection Act (H.R.
At present, that notion, too, feels like a drastic overreach for something that's generally just kinda cute.
Steve Southerland (R-Fla.) has introduced "Waters of the United States Regulatory Overreach Protection Act" (H.R.