Overemployment


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Overemployment

1. A situation in which a person consistently works more hours than they can sustainably work. That is, overemployment occurs when one is overworked. Some companies, such as brokerages and other major corporations, may encourage overemployment by promoting a culture in which those who work the most hours tend to receive promotions.

2. See: Overstaffing.
References in periodicals archive ?
London has the lowest rate of overemployment on 7.6%, a fall of 0.5% since 2008.
government's proliferation and increased use of unmanned aerial vehicles (drones) (6) over the past decade; (7) the negative ramifications for the CIA in their ability to collect and analyze intelligence because of their overemployment of drones; and the United States' involvement with Pakistan at the strategic and tactical level.
It follows then that State enterprises are inclined towards thriftless manpower-management, namely to overemployment, and the wage increase dispensing with a solid financial basis by exceeding value added.
Assembly line balancing helps us avoid overproduction, inventory, transportation, motion, waiting, overemployment. With combination with other methods like MTM and UAS is possible to reduce Non-value Added Processing.
Another reason can be in quite high overemployment at the beginning of the studied period (1996-1998) followed by a period of high increase in the unemployment rate (1998-2000).
(8) To test for the possible level of overemployment by connected firms, I compute the ratio of the number of employees over total assets.
For many professionals extended work hours often become the rule, rather than the exception, leading to a semi-permanent or even permanent state of overemployment (Pocock, 2005).
Underemployment and overemployment increased risks of disease 1 to 3 months later (p < 0.05) and enduring interpersonal difficulties with family and friends at 3 to 6 months following the experience(s) (p < 0.05).
Overemployment occurs when there are workers who are willing but unable to reduce their hours of work at their current or a comparable job, even if they are prepared to accept proportionately lower income.
Cost savings of $57,938 in this case study came from decreased sick leave, decreased recruitment, reduced overemployment, and reduced need for new employees to replace those on disability leave.
Lonnie Golden and Tesfayi Gebreselassie also look at a less-studied aspect of labor economics--"overemployment mismatches" in which employees work more hours than they would desire if they could choose hours and income without constraints.
For example, as the Egyptian government maintained a high percentage of ownership of many corporations throughout the 1990s, inefficient overemployment at these organizations continued, and attempts to draw foreign investment into these companies failed.