Out

(redirected from out-of-pocket)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to out-of-pocket: Out-of-pocket expenses

Out

Used in the context of general equities. (1) No longer obligated to an order, as it has already been canceled: (2) advertised on Autex.

Out

Describing a canceled order.
References in periodicals archive ?
Security asked the participants how they would handle $1,000 in out-of-pocket health care costs, and how they would handle $5,000 in out-of-pocket costs.
This private cost borne by citizens is also referred to as the out-of-pocket health expenditure.
The study reveals a correlation between high out-of-pocket medical costs and delaying or ignoring medical care," says Dave Mahder, vice president and chief marketing officer of group and worksite markets at Guardian Life.
We looked only at the premium and out-of-pocket limit figures.
Total spending on purchases related to self-care approaches (for example, self-help materials, such as books or CDs, related to complementary health topics) was $2,700,000,000, and the mean annual out-of-pocket expenditure per user was $257.
As family income went up, out-of-pocket spending on complementary approaches went up significantly.
Contributions stay with the individual, paying out-of-pocket costs through job changes and through retirement.
Since many women are unaware of the ACA's contraception coverage mandate, the impact of the mandate will "depend on how sensitive consumers are to out-of-pocket expenses for contraceptives and how many women were dissuaded from using contraceptive products by that expense before the mandate's implementation," they wrote.
Maximum out-of-pocket costs for PPACA-approved HealthCare.
But if he gets really sick or has an accident, his out-of-pocket expenses could go as high as $5,200 a year in a worst-case scenario.
The Affordable Care Act also caps the amount you can be asked to spend out-of-pocket each year at $6,350 in total (medical and prescription drug) spending for 2014 In 2014, the maximum is $12,700 for a family.
But consumers are spending more on out-of-pocket costs, and women and young adults are now carrying a bigger burden.