other liabilities

Other Liabilities

Liabilities that a company must pay but that are too small to record separately on a balance sheet. That is, other liabilities are all miscellaneous obligations that a company lumps together on financial statements.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

other liabilities

Small and relatively insignificant liabilities. For financial reporting purposes, firms often combine small liabilities into this single category rather than listing each liability separately.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is billed as an opportunity to start fresh, shielding everyone from exposure to malpractice suits and other liabilities. However, the reality is that anyone looking to sue either old corporation will simply sue the new entity as the so-called successor corporation, on the grounds that it has assumed responsibility for its predecessors' liabilities.
It is billed as an opportunity to start fresh, shielding everyone from exposure to malpractice suits and other liabilities. However, the reality is that anyone looking to sue either old corporation will simply sue the new entity as the so-called "successor" corporation, on the grounds that it has assumed responsibility for its predecessors' liabilities.
Such obligations generally are treated the same as other liabilities for purposes of determining whether their assumption is taxable as "boot" or additional proceeds.
This option has the downside of putting each of the partners in the chain of title, exposing them personally to possible environmental remediation liabilities and such other liabilities as are inherent in real estate ownership.
It is billed as an opportunity to start flesh, shielding everyone from exposure to malpractice suits and other liabilities, but the reality is, anyone looking to sue either old corporation will simply sue corporation C as the so-called "successor" corporation, on the grounds that it has assumed responsibility for its predecessors' liabilities.
Practitioners must also be aware of their potential exposure to penalties arising from the Code or any other liabilities or responsibilities they may assume or incur with indirect income reconstruction cases.
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