orthographic

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orthographic

A three-dimensional image represented in two dimensions with no perspective, as if the original were truly flat.Architectural drawings of elevations—the different sides of a building—have no perspective detail but are orthographic. Many local tax assessor's offices and online property information services include orthographic aerial or satellite photographs of properties, corrected for the earth's curvature.

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Similar results were found in a study done in Italian, which is also a transparent orthography Italian (Di Filippo et al.
Each is introduced briefly with reference to key elements--familial relations, property holdings, witnesses--and a brief comment about the orthography of the particular notary.
From the point of view of the present article it is important to note in which way certain phonetic phenomena have been represented in Livonian orthography, or in other words, how the present day Livonian orthography developed.
Seeing how Mr LAwis likes to embellish his name with a superfluous French accent, which does nothing more than tell a foreigner how any Welshman would say his name, I am surprised he has not called for the design of a new Welsh orthography, to replace our diagraphs with single symbols.
Santanee Phasuk and Philip Start state that, from close study of the maps' internal historical evidence, orthography and artistic style, they "may thus well be the only extant maps from the early reigns of the Chakri dynasty" (Kings Rama I-III inclusive; from the late 18th to mid-19th centuries).
inadvertently) is merely correcting the orthography and thus completing
The new edition largely retains, with very minor changes, the orthography and punctuation of the Berthelet's 1529 edition.
As a consequence, English orthography contains many irregular or exception words such as 'have', 'shoe' and 'one'.
The students were learning a new orthography (writing system) and were unable to read the old Kwak'wala one.
Videotapes were assessed in terms of 1) general characteristics of the interaction, 2) references to specific components of the Hebrew orthography, and 3) maternal strategy of mediating the graphic-phonemic code, and the printing of the letters.
He offers both titles as "single comprehensive sources of definitive information," highlighting instances where differing units of measurement and orthography, changing ship reconfigurations, and absence of records (especially for the Confederate States Navy) make it difficult or impossible to give reconciled, authoritative figures or information.