I

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I

Fifth letter of a Nasdaq stock symbol specifying that it is the third preferred bond of the company.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

I

1. On a stock transaction table, a symbol indicating that a dividend was paid after a stock split.

2. A symbol appearing next to a bond listed on NASDAQ indicating that the bond is a company's third preferred bond. All NASDAQ listings use a four-letter abbreviation; if the letter "I" follows the abbreviation, this indicates that the security being traded is a third preferred bond.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

i

Used in the dividend column of stock transaction tables to indicate that the dividend was paid after a stock dividend or split: Lehigh s.20i.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
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In our study, oral cavity cancers most commonly presented with mass/growth (84%) followed by non-healing ulcer (27.3%) and oropharyngeal cancers most commonly presented with dysphagia (65.7%) followed by odynophagia (57.1%).
length of practice, practice setting etc) with the knowledge about the vaccine, knowledge about HPV associated oropharyngeal cancer, and recommendation of the HPV vaccine for males.
All dental care professionals need to educate themselves and their patients about the relationship between oropharyngeal cancers, HPV, and risk factor management.
Ang, "The epidemic of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancer is here: is it time to change our treatment paradigms?" Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network, vol.
It is estimated that the prevalence of HPV in patients with oropharyngeal cancer is about 36%, with HPV16 being the commonest type (~86%) in all HPV-positive (HPV+) tumors (8).
Among specific topics are the diagnosis and management of deep neck infections, oropharyngeal cancer, evaluating and managing gastroesophageal reflux, diagnostic imaging techniques in otology, assessing olfactory disorders, and implants for facial plastic surgery.
HPV infection is rapidly becoming the most important risk factor for cancers of the oropharynx, with the incidence of HPV+ oropharyngeal cancer rising in the United States.
When 70-year-old Ken Wayne Broskey of Livonia, Michigan, learned that he had stage 4 oropharyngeal cancer with lung metastases, he took on a job as an Uber cab driver to try to pay off the house he shares with his daughter, a waitress, and his grandchildren, against the advice of his doctors, who urged him to consider hospice.
(5) Oral HPV infection is increasing at a considerable rate, and the projected number of HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer cases is expected to surpass the annual number of cervical cancer cases by 2020.5 The most prevalent type of HPV associated with oral infection is type 16.
This case shows that a metastatic SCC can be masked by an overlying mastoiditis, and thus it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with a history of oropharyngeal cancer.
Human papillomavirus (HPV) and oropharyngeal cancer Fact sheet.