organizational behaviour


Also found in: Acronyms.

organizational behaviour

an umbrella term for theories and disciplines concerned with human behaviour in ORGANIZATIONS and the influences upon it. Approaches with this focus include INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS, OCCUPATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, ORGANIZATIONAL ANALYSIS and the SOCIOLOGY OF WORK. Though the boundaries between these are not distinct, they differ according to the emphasis they accord to individual or collective behaviour, and the relative importance they attach to structural (societal or organizational) or inter-personal determinants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Approaches of the research into the organizational behaviour may be understood more easily if we answer the question What is the organization and its components?
The book has taken a global approach with updated current knowledge, illustrating theories and concepts of organizational behaviour. This book can help readers understand and influence behavior in organizations by presentation of connects between contemporary OB theories and actual events in organizations around the world and is definitely worth reference and reading.
Organizational behaviour provides the indispensable foundation of knowledge that is absolutely essential if one hopes to achieve success in educational leadership.
Researchers who study organizational behaviour attribute this phenomenon to the following characteristics relating to the development of social processes at business organizations:
Dependent proneness has a negative impact on organizational behaviour. A collectivist personality will be a good fit in organi-zations that value relationship more than sheer performance.
Each contributor focuses on some of the traditional elements of organizational behaviour, which, as Wilson rightly points out, is a complex and varied field of study.
The view that organizations are mechanisms through which deliberate goals are set and achieved has long driven our understanding that such goals are the explanation or cause of organizational behaviour (Wright, 1976).
Gabriel states that he does not want to supplant existing and traditional theories of organizational behaviour. Rather, he would like to complement mainstream organizational explanations of organizational behaviour with a Freudian interpretation.
What is missing for me - and what I believe would make them captivating for the reader - is the absence of a more acute sense of the drama of organizational life, and more evidence of the messiness of organizational behaviour. Such aspects are very difficult to capture and present in print, especially if authors are seeking to please (impress even) an academic audience but that doesn't mean they shouldn't be more fully reported and acknowledged.
Given this, it seems reasonable to review the structure and content of the cases and then assess the book's suitability as a support for more traditional texts in organizational behaviour including the assistance it provides the readers in their evaluation of the utility of theories.
Organizational Behaviour and Human Performance, 22, 474-496.
Organizational Behaviour: Text and Cases Dr Kavita Singh, Pearson Education, New Delhi, 2009, Pages 479.
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