Ordinary

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Ordinary

Common and accepted in the general industry or type of activity in which the taxpayer is engaged. It is one of the tests for the deductibility of expenses incurred or paid in connection with a trade or business; for the production of income; for the management, conservation, or maintenance of property held for the production of income; or in connection with the determination, collection, or refund of any tax.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Ginzberg, the women's very ordinariness suggests that their petition represents a "tiny glimpse" into a much larger phenomenon, a process in which "an idea repeatedly declared unthinkable gets raised among a small group of people, is launched into public debate, and becomes part of a conversation about the rights and responsibilities of the nation's citizens" (p.
This ordinariness seems both a function of script and a function of the acting.
At 19, and with the world telling you otherwise, ordinariness is probably the last thing you'd welcome as a birthday present.
"Ohio's glory lay in the ordinariness of its citizens," said Andrew Cayton, Miami University history professor.
The story was well told, making Jaegerstatter very accessible and thereby challenging to all of us who think ourselves excused from heroism by our ordinariness.
No faux elegance, no glib intellectualizing, nothing to distract from the complete ordinariness of the personality.
After I interviewed that woman, it haunted me: her way of telling it, the mundaneness of the fact, the ordinariness of the woman who had one bad experience and then never had sex for the rest of her life.
Christians as well as Jews today may rely on the ordinariness of talking to an extra-ordinary God as a shared resource in the effort to reestablish moral and religious order after the Shoah and after modernity.
Independent visiting is about bringing stability and ordinariness into their lives.''
The reader senses that Harlan's spiritual transformation into a faith healer is as much the result of her own needs as it is a "gift of the spirit." In fact, Harlan's insistence on her ordinariness cannot erase the frequently extraordinary moments of her story.
When director Kimberly Peirce lets her break out of her ordinariness in a passionate moment with Teena, her hair tumbles under her on the ground and she looks suddenly lovely, suffused in a warm Renaissance glow.
Hence, a Black feminist approach to rhetorical criticism celebrates the theoretical significance of the "ordinariness of everyday life" to reveal Black women's ways of crafting identities within an oppressive, socially-constructed reality.