Ort

(redirected from oral rehydration therapy)
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Ort

A Norwegian unit of weight approximately equivalent to a kilogram.
References in periodicals archive ?
International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, considered leader in diarrheal research is credited with the discovery of oral rehydration therapy (ORT) and zinc supplementation, which is saving millions of children worldwide from diarrheal deaths.
Acute gastroenteritis is a common childhood illness, and guidelines for treatment recommend supportive care using oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for mild to moderate dehydration, but no pharmacologic treatment for vomiting.
Current practice guidelines for treating children with gastroenteritis recommend oral rehydration therapy, but the guidelines don't recommend a drug treatment for vomiting, wrote Dr.
Oral rehydration therapy - This was developed in the early 1970s to replace fluids and chemicals lost through diarrhoea and vomiting.
babies with diarrhea are still not getting the 10-cent doses of oral rehydration therapy." Why?
Maternal practices in infantile diarrheic disease and oral rehydration therapy. Salud Publica Mex 1998; 40: 256-264.
Easterly explains that medicine to prevent half of malaria deaths is available at 12 cents a dose, and there are almost 2 million child deaths annually caused by diarrhea that could be prevented with 10-cent doses of oral rehydration therapy. Yet, as he notes, while the West has spent $2.3 trillion in foreign aid over five decades, even such simple aid has not reached those sufferers.
The investigators primarily assessed how many children vomited during oral rehydration therapy by conducting phone interviews with the families
Some of the effective interventions include promoting breastfeeding, having skilled care during pregnancy and birth, oral rehydration therapy, antibiotics, vitamin A and other micronutrients, and antimalarial drugs.
Five children had received oral rehydration therapy (ORT) for their diarrheal illness; three received no ORT during their clinic visits.
However, nutritional assessment, nutritional screening methods during emergencies, nutritional supplementation and oral rehydration therapy are relevant to developing countries.
[20] These community workers were then asked to provide instruction in oral rehydration therapy to mothers.