opportunism

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opportunism

a situation in which one party to a CONTRACT is able to take advantage of the other party or parties to the contract. See ASYMMETRICAL INFORMATION, ADVERSE SELECTION, MORAL HAZARD.
References in classic literature ?
To abandon the square was to lose it to his opponent and win for himself ignoble and immediate death before the jeering populace.
They saw the Black Chief step quickly back, his point upon the ground, while his opponent, his sword slipping from his fingers, clutched his breast, sank to his knees and then lunged forward upon his face.
D'Artagnan was too good a swordsman to trifle with his opponent. He made a rapid and brilliant feint which Mordaunt parried.
Mordaunt replied by trying his opponent's weapon with an amount of strength which the Gascon was astonished to find in a form apparently so feeble; but thanks to a parry no less clever than that which Mordaunt had just achieved, he succeeded in meeting his sword, which slid along his own without touching his chest.
And if we are able thus to attack an inferior force with a superior one, our opponents will be in dire straits.
His opponent only was applauded--if he struck a blow, if he escaped a blow; he, Ponta, who had forced the fighting from the start, had received no word of cheer.
Not once did Ponta succeed in striking his opponent the deadly final blow.
In tricks and skill and experience he was the master, and though he could land nothing vital, he proceeded scientifically to chop and wear down his opponent. He landed three blows to Rivera's one, but they were punishing blows only, and not deadly.
It was directly after receiving one of these in his arm, that Mr Haredale, making a keener thrust as he felt the warm blood spirting out, plunged his sword through his opponent's body to the hilt.
His opponent's duller and more material mind quailed before the fire and intensity of a higher spiritual nature.
They said that undoubtedly war, particularly against such a genius as Bonaparte (they called him Bonaparte now), needs most deeply devised plans and profound scientific knowledge and in that respect Pfuel was a genius, but at the same time it had to be acknowledged that the theorists are often one sided, and therefore one should not trust them absolutely, but should also listen to what Pfuel's opponents and practical men of experience in warfare had to say, and then choose a middle course.
Instead of using an opera- glass they view the acts of their opponents with ME!"