closed shop

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Related to open shop: agency shop, union shop

closed shop

a requirement that all employees in a given workplace or organization be members of a specified TRADE UNION. There are two types of closed shop:
  1. pre-entry closed shop, where union membership is necessary to gain employment;
  2. post-entry closed shop, where union membership is necessary once employment has commenced.

The pre-entry closed shop, traditionally found in parts of the printing and food wholesaling industries, was often unilaterally imposed by unions, whereas the post-entry closed shop has often been formally recognized in Union Membership Agreements with managements. Many managers found the post-entry closed shop advantageous since it helped to ensure that union representatives speak for all employees. However, it can be viewed as an infringement of individual rights. See CONTRACT OF EMPLOYMENT.

Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

closed shop

a requirement that all employees in a given workplace or ORGANIZATION be members of a specified TRADE UNION. Closed shops are often imposed by powerful trade unions as a means of restricting the supply of labour and maintaining high wage rates for members. See SUPPLY-SIDE ECONOMICS.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
As full-time employees of our companies, open shop workers draw a regular salary and benefits whether work is hectic or slow.
An open shop would be "the total devastation of the union," said Herb Goodrick, executive secretary of the St.
For all the contribution of the MMA to the recurrent war for the union-free "open shop," its members' corporate neighbors provided the heavy artillery.
As for the Roundtable and contractor commitment to fair employment practices, Linder notes that today fewer minority workers are employed in the open shop than belong to building trades unions.
The high unemployment was partly attributable to competition from open shop and nonunion contractors.
Robert Sanna, executive vice president and head of construction at Forest City Ratner, the company behind Barclays Center, Pacific Park and other prominent mixed-use projects in Brooklyn, said he knows of at least one developer in the borough that is using open shop firms for a large commercial development.
What advice would Cordua give to other Latin Americans looking to open shop in the U.S.?
She's also quick to say that $1,000 isn't enough to open shop, even though she now has 40 employees and manages over $1 billion in construction projects.
His proof is the person and career of Walter Drew, the foremost open shop crusader of his day.
Open shop construction, an arrangement where both union and non-union firms work different portions of a job site, has become commonplace in residential projects as developers look to cut costs on wages.