offer

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Offer

Indicates a willingness to sell at a given price. Related: Bid.

Ask

The lowest price for which a seller is willing to sell some asset. When one makes a buy order, one may order a broker to buy at the ask, which is simply the best price currently available. The difference between the ask and the bid is called the bid-ask spread, which is a key measure of liquidity.

offer

See ask.

Offer.

The offer is the price at which someone who owns a security is willing to sell it. It's also known as the ask price, and is typically paired with the bid price, which is what someone who wants to buy the security is willing to pay. Together they constitute a quotation.

offer

see CONTRACT.

offer

A commitment to do some act,usually to buy or sell something,upon specified terms which, if accepted, would create an enforceable contract. The person making the offer is the offeror; the person receiving it is the offeree.Some important concepts include

• An offer may be withdrawn at any time before it is accepted, unless the offer by its terms stated it would be irrevocable for a specified period of time or other conditions.

• The mailbox rule states that if an offer is made via the mail, or if an offer does not limit acceptance to some vehicle other than the mail, then it may be accepted by mail. If so, then acceptance is effective when it is placed in the mail, not when received by the offeror. As a result, the offer may not be withdrawn once acceptance has been placed in the mail.

• The Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act provides that e-mail offers are accepted when the return e-mail has been received by the offeror, not when it is sent.

• Some states have held that fax transmissions of acceptance are effective when faxed.

• An offer that is “accepted,” but with changes in some of the terms or conditions, is a counteroffer and is not an acceptance. A counteroffer is a new offer that must be accepted or rejected. The old offer may not be resurrected at that point.

• Aproperty auctioned without reserve is an offer that may not be withdrawn. Unless specified otherwise, all auctions are presumed to be with reserve and the property may be withdrawn at any time before acceptance.

• Upon receiving an offer from a potential purchaser, an agent is obligated to transmit it to the client as soon as possible, even if the agent thinks it is a poor offer that will not be accepted. Further, an agent may not retain an offer until receipt of another, in order to present them together, unless the client has given specific instructions to act in that manner.

References in classic literature ?
I can offer you nothing else, for I haven't liv'd so long in the wilderness, not to know the scrupulous ways of a gentleman."
He made no professions to be but of an extraordinary respect, and he had such an opinion of my virtue, that, as he often professed, he believed if he should offer anything else, I should reject him with contempt.
And indeed I had a great deal of reason to say so of him too; for though we lodged both on a floor, and he had frequently come into my chamber, even when I was in bed, and I also into his when he was in bed, yet he never offered anything to me further than a kiss, or so much as solicited me to anything till long after, as you shall hear.
This being so, I say I thank you, sirs, for the offer you have made me, which places me under the obligation of complying with the request you have made of me; though I fear the account I shall give you of my misfortunes will excite in you as much concern as compassion, for you will be unable to suggest anything to remedy them or any consolation to alleviate them.
He bribed all the household, he gave and offered gifts and presents to my parents; every day was like a holiday or a merry-making in our street; by night no one could sleep for the music; the love letters that used to come to my hand, no one knew how, were innumerable, full of tender pleadings and pledges, containing more promises and oaths than there were letters in them; all which not only did not soften me, but hardened my heart against him, as if he had been my mortal enemy, and as if everything he did to make me yield were done with the opposite intention.
Tom declared that "the old chap broke down when they got as far as the fortune--that, as he liked the girl, he would have taken her with $75,000, but the highest offer he could get from him was $30,000.
He did court the old fellow; got introduced to the family; was a favorite from the first; offered in a fortnight, was accepted, and got married within the month.
When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to the gods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did not yet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in the course of which some among us turned their ships back again, and sailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I, and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw that mischief was brewing.
Briggs declared that it would be delightful, and vowed that her dear Miss Crawley was always kind and generous, and went up to Rebecca's bedroom to console her and prattle about the offer, and the refusal, and the cause thereof; and to hint at the generous intentions of Miss Crawley, and to find out who was the gentleman that had the mastery of Miss Sharp's heart.
A young Parsee, with an intelligent face, offered his services, which Mr.
One would have thought that nothing could be simpler than for him, a man of good family, rather rich than poor, and thirty-two years old, to make the young Princess Shtcherbatskaya an offer of marriage; in all likelihood he would at once have been looked upon as a good match.
Let us ask some priest or prophet, or some reader of dreams (for dreams, too, are of Jove) who can tell us why Phoebus Apollo is so angry, and say whether it is for some vow that we have broken, or hecatomb that we have not offered, and whether he will accept the savour of lambs and goats without blemish, so as to take away the plague from us."