offer

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Offer

Indicates a willingness to sell at a given price. Related: Bid.

Ask

The lowest price for which a seller is willing to sell some asset. When one makes a buy order, one may order a broker to buy at the ask, which is simply the best price currently available. The difference between the ask and the bid is called the bid-ask spread, which is a key measure of liquidity.

offer

See ask.

Offer.

The offer is the price at which someone who owns a security is willing to sell it. It's also known as the ask price, and is typically paired with the bid price, which is what someone who wants to buy the security is willing to pay. Together they constitute a quotation.

offer

see CONTRACT.

offer

A commitment to do some act,usually to buy or sell something,upon specified terms which, if accepted, would create an enforceable contract. The person making the offer is the offeror; the person receiving it is the offeree.Some important concepts include

• An offer may be withdrawn at any time before it is accepted, unless the offer by its terms stated it would be irrevocable for a specified period of time or other conditions.

• The mailbox rule states that if an offer is made via the mail, or if an offer does not limit acceptance to some vehicle other than the mail, then it may be accepted by mail. If so, then acceptance is effective when it is placed in the mail, not when received by the offeror. As a result, the offer may not be withdrawn once acceptance has been placed in the mail.

• The Uniform Computer Information Transactions Act provides that e-mail offers are accepted when the return e-mail has been received by the offeror, not when it is sent.

• Some states have held that fax transmissions of acceptance are effective when faxed.

• An offer that is “accepted,” but with changes in some of the terms or conditions, is a counteroffer and is not an acceptance. A counteroffer is a new offer that must be accepted or rejected. The old offer may not be resurrected at that point.

• Aproperty auctioned without reserve is an offer that may not be withdrawn. Unless specified otherwise, all auctions are presumed to be with reserve and the property may be withdrawn at any time before acceptance.

• Upon receiving an offer from a potential purchaser, an agent is obligated to transmit it to the client as soon as possible, even if the agent thinks it is a poor offer that will not be accepted. Further, an agent may not retain an offer until receipt of another, in order to present them together, unless the client has given specific instructions to act in that manner.

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Universal Manhole Key Kit - offered PS40,000 for 35 per cent by Deborah Meaden.
Hippocrates Gate Feature Included in Feature offered
In many cases, though, the clients should be offered a tour of the secure site and even the opportunity to view the shredding of their own files via a closed-circuit television system or other Web-based video system, or even at a plant viewing room.
For example, the messenger may provide a comparison of the offered terms with other contracts agreed to by network participants; however, it would be legally dangerous for the messenger to express an opinion on the terms offered.
It is offered through the Iowa Online Consortium in spring semester.
REBNY asserts that when the bids are compared accurately, the amount offered is much less than $600 million.
The support has continued in a variety of ways, including a total of $150,000 in scholarships offered by automotive companies annually, and professionals to serve on CAI's advisory committee and board of directors.
There has been confusion among church leaders over what the minister offered. But Ms.
In order to qualify for the exemption from registration, the securities must be offered in a private transaction exclusively to defined classes of large institutions referred to in Rule 144A as "qualified institutional buyers," or "QIBs." The public policy underlying Rule 144A assumes that, because of their size and sophistication, QIBs do not need the protection of the registration requirements of the securities laws.
Every LTC Web site should say "who" the facility is, what management believes in, and what is offered. It should also answer why a prospective resident would want to move there, and how to get in touch with the facility.
* In total, the average undergraduate can save over $1,022 over the life of the loan by taking advantage of all the benefits offered by CFS.
Forty-two percent of physicians reported that they offer an HIV test as part of their standard prenatal testing; 16% of physicians offered HIV testing to a quarter or fewer of their pregnant patients.