choice

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choice

the necessity for CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES and PRIVATE ENTERPRISE ECONOMIES to have to choose which goods and services to produce and in what quantities, arising from the relative SCARCITY of economic resources (FACTORS OF PRODUCTION) available to produce those goods and services. See ECONOMICS, PREFERENCES.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this case, a brute desire for lemon tart would not be a justifying ground; rather, considerations about which dessert is more conducive to my longevity would provide the justification of choice. If a brute desire can be a justifying ground at all, it can be one only in cases of trivial importance.
But these appear to have been selected--and the project thereby limited--largely in response to criticisms from opponents of choice. When Professor X complains that choice for the poor will skim the "best and the brightest," the authors answer that it did not do so in the programs studied.
The same catchphrases recur: delegation, parallel processing, the virtues of redundancy, and the infinitude of choice in a complex self-organizing system.
Most necessary reform: The only genuine system of choice in education is one in which people are free to keep their own money and educate their children in the manner they deem best.
Cambria Suites, MainStay Suites, Econo Lodge, and Rodeway lnn are proprietary trademarks and service marks of Choice Hotels International.
Consider the power of choice in the hands of families who have little or no power because they control no resources.
Others still have not released final lists of choice schools, creating confusion and limiting interest.
Under this ISO model, the consumer achieves a maximum level of choice, autonomy control, and program flexibility while being wholly responsible for the majority of administrative and management functions (including employment taxes) an employer must comply with.
A shallow "politics of choice" has crept its way into gender politics, acting as a wedge to slowly pry apart the integrity of the feminist analysis of society.
I am grateful for the opportunity to offer some comments on Virginia Postrel's thoughtful but critical article ("Consumer Vertigo," June) about my recent book, The Paradox of Choice.
Though enterprising parents among the disadvantaged are more able to avail themselves of choice than others, Greene observes that this is no less true of "food stamps, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, and virtually all other antipoverty programs." He notes that, although few studies have examined the impact of choice on public school students, most every finding to date suggests that vouchers, rather than adversely affecting students who are "left behind" in public schools, actually lead to gains for public and private school students.
And most of them must have recognized that those choices--determining their economic future, and the nation's--were more significant, if not more immediately satisfying, than the consumer version of choice laid out in The Next Deal.