Oddity

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Oddity

In numismatics, anything unusual about a coin. An oddity may have occurred during the minting process or at some point after, and may affect the value of a coin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Allnach's imaginative dream worlds kick off right away in Oddities & Entities with "Boneview," where a young girl of Creole origins accesses fantastic worlds through artwork in a tattoo parlor but is simultaneously terrorized by spirits.
Baseball Oddities & Trivia: A Journey Through the Weird, Wacky, and Absolutely True World of Baseball".
In his book "Bible Marvels, Oddities and Shockers" you are certain to learn many new facts.
Repeat this process continuously for 200,000 years and all manner of oddities take shape.
Hamm created skatepark oddities like the absurdicon (steep kinked hubba) and also the perplexer (transitions that shoot you into walls).
Readers will enjoy the fascinating images in Eugenic Design, which include oddities such as the "Criterion" toilet designed to enforce the hygienically correct posture during evacuation ("the sloped seat angled backward, achieving the natural position every time," in a chapter that links concern for biological efficiency with streamlining (141).
So huge and provocative a project--good value, in fact, for [pounds sterling]100--is not without its problems and there are some oddities here, possibly because readers in different countries will have varying ideas about what constitutes a classic.
Porn Theater), envelope-pushing indies (Irreversible; Clean, Shaven), and some flat-out oddities (Baxter, a French film about an evil dog and his best friend, a prepubescent neo-Nazi).
In the case of carnivals, world fairs, and freak shows, the promotion of human oddities relied on meticulously crafted public personas.
Animal Oddities," by Mark Bregman, Science World, September 7, 1998.
Through my case writing and teaching experience, I have compiled a list of seven quirks, oddities, and potential dysfunctions that seem present in the cultures of program offices and the overall defense acquisition system.
In a typical treatment, under the headline "Matinee Mitt," John Miller admits in National Review that some of Romney's Republican opponents might highlight a few of "Mormonism's doctrinal oddities," but concludes that "there is no telling how this will play out," and "it's even possible to think that Romney's Mormonism could become a hidden asset.