Load

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Load

The sales fee charged to an investor when shares are purchased in a load fund or annuity. See: Back-end load; front-end load; level load.

Load

A sales charge or commission one pays for purchasing a mutual fund. The charge is paid to the person(s) who sold the investor shares in the fund. There are three types of load. A front-end load occurs when the shareholder pays the fee when buying into the fund. A back-end load means that the investor pays when selling his/her shares. Finally, an investor with a level-load fund pays periodically throughout his/her time as a shareholder. Studies have shown that load funds perform neither better nor worse than no-load funds.

load

The sales fee the buyer pays in order to acquire an asset. This fee varies according to the type of asset and the way it is sold. Many mutual funds impose a sales charge. As a result of the load, only a portion of the investor's funds go into the investment itself. Also called front-end load, sales load.

Load.

If you buy a mutual fund through a broker or other financial professional, you pay a sales charge or commission, also called a load.

If the charge is levied when you purchase the shares, it's called a front-end load. If you pay when you sell shares, it's called a back-end load or contingent deferred sales charge. And with a level load, you pay a percentage of your investment amount each year you own the fund.

load

the work which is assigned to a workstation (machine or operative) during a specified period of time. See PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING.

Load

A load is a sales charge imposed when mutual fund shares are purchased or redeemed.
References in periodicals archive ?
We verify, in both analyses, that the action of the posterior occlusal loads promotes elevated stress concentration especially in the regions described above.
Occlusal loads, particularly lateral forces, may cause the teeth to flex.
In this study we got a consistent result with this finding that VMII having highest m value and lowest characteristic strength did not show stress accumulation under normal occlusal loads. On the other hand, it was the only material that showed failure in ME and E restoration designs under 600 N and 900 N occlusal loads, respectively.
Previous workers have shown that preservation of tooth structure is important for its protection against fracture under occlusal loads and for its survival.
The final layer is a flexible resin composite that is firm enough to hold teeth under all occlusal loads, but flexible enough to allow delivery of the dental appliance without adjusting any undercuts.
Hence it is imperative that teeth that may serve as abutments and be subjected to increased occlusal loads, such as in patients with extreme vertical overlap and bruxism, be evaluated with other parameters as well as the measurement of CRR.