Obsolete

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Related to obsoleteness: obsolescence

Obsolete

1. In numismatics, describing a coin that is no longer minted or no longer circulates. Obsolete coins may be valuable as collector's items, but they are illiquid assets.

2. See: Obsolescence.
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References in periodicals archive ?
1984b "Exploration into syntactic obsoleteness: English a-X-ing and X-ing", in: Jacek Fisiak (ed.) Historical syntax.
(21.) See Gottfried, "Panajotis Kondylis and the Obsoleteness of Conservatism," Modern Age 39, no.
Operating lease is more favourable whenever leased equipment is exposed to risk of obsoleteness or the time span for which the equipment is leased is short, or the leased equipment is a common one, i.e.
Despite the ambitions of nineteenth- and twentieth-century nationalism, the idea of the nation-whether defined as an existing state or in nineteenth-century quasi-metaphysical terms-represents no such quantum, particularly when many nations give their own inflections to the same literary language, There is no distinct national character or essence for literature to express, even if we disguise the obsoleteness of the concept by rechristening it "cultural practices." Instead there is something better: a nearly inexhaustible complex of changing cultures and polities that influence each other ceaselessly through a common medium of communication.
In our study, we investigated whether this imagery of obsoleteness and decay of the working-class uses on the street could possibly represent one type of visual signification, one conditioned by common images of what is prosperity and what is urbanistically attractive.
With a gimlet eye for the weakness and disarray of her social democratic enemies, Thatcher counterposed the modernity of the marketplace to the obsoleteness of the state, forcing a choice between inefficiency and enterprise, between familiarity and novelty, in essence between past and future.
Even if these numbers reflect a general standard of living much higher than that prevailing in the rest of the world, they hardly indicate the existence of merely "residual poverty" and the attainme"freedom from want." This situation at home in conjunction with the state of starvation and discase endured by the majority of mankind living in the underdeveloped countries puts in sharp relief the callousness of the now-so-fashionable talk about the unimportance of further output increases and about the obsoleteness of the "conventional wisdom" as it relates to the husbandry of productive resources.