Obligor

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Obligor

A person who has an obligation to pay off a debt.

Obligor

The party to an agreement who owes an obligation to another party. An obligation is a requirement, especially a legal one. For example, an investor may have a legal obligation to disclose his/her investments to the SEC. In this circumstance, the obligor is the investor. See also: Obligee.

obligor

A party who owes an obligation.A borrower is an obligor.

References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, some issuers enter into lease-like "associated arrangements" in which they hold legal title to assets that are purchased or constructed with the conduit debt proceeds and receive payments from the obligor for its use of that underlying asset.
The remaining obligors accounting for more than 5.0% of the pool's total are Oakland County (9.0%), Dearborn (6.3%), Wayne County (5.3%, general obligation debt rated 'BBB-'), and Ann Arbor (5.3%).
Cal are Art's joint obligors, not solidary obligors.
If there are N obligors in a credit portfolio then, conditional on the realized value of the common market factor, [[??].sub.M] = [e.sub.M], the number of portfolio defaults, n, has a binomial distribution,
m: number of obligors in the portfolio that have the probability to default,
The previous guidelines failed to incorporate in a substantive way the obligee's income in determining the amount to be paid by the obligor.
The obligor is the person who is obligated to pay the support ordered by the court and the obligee is the person entitled to receive the support awarded by the court.
Of note, one of the goals of the SNC enhancements is to gather private obligor default ratings by banks and to aggregate same to build a composite rating system for regulators to use to assess counterparty risk.
As a lender, if you are financing equipment to obligors in an INDUSTRY that is easily impacted by common economic factors, it will be difficult to accurately predict losses.
In a typical company's portfolio of receivables, it is not uncommon to have four or five obligors representing a large proportion of the total risk.
In 1996, the Second District Court of Appeal reversed the trier of fact who had imputed income to an incarcerated obligor. In Waugh v.