Overweight

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Overweight

Usually refers to recommendation that leads an investor to increase their investment in a particular security or asset class. The increase is usually with respect to a benchmark. Suppose that U.S. equities compose 40% of the benchmark portfolio. If one thinks the U.S. will outperform, the investor may increase the exposure to U.S. equity to more than 40%.

Overweight

1. See: Market outperform.

2. See: Overperform.

3. Describing a portfolio where one security or industry has too much representation. For example, an overweight portfolio may be overexposed to the financial industry, which means if the financial industry suffers a downturn the portfolio will decline in value more than other similar portfolios. See also: Diversification.
References in periodicals archive ?
The questionnaire included information such as socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle factors, family history of obesity, presence or absence of some chronic diseases.
I think, in general, many more people now think of obesity as a disease.
The obesity epidemic has taken the Middle East in its grip, bringing along a tide of chronic disease that will severely affect population's well-being and test national health systems.
Ways to Enhance Children's Activity & Nutrition) is a national education program initiated in 2005 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as an obesity prevention program that is now partnered with more than 40 national health organizations.
9) A more recent study that looked at 60 meta-analyses and 23 systematic reviews of interventions to prevent and treat obesity found that the majority of reviews reported only modest effect sizes in outcomes such as dietary habits, physical activity and anthropometric measures (e.
Data from 2012 demonstrate that the prevalence of overweight and obesity continue to increase in Canada.
Is the number of obesity cases on the rise in the Sultanate If so, why rates of obesity in this population group may be rising
Eric Oliver, author of Fat Politics, and University of Colorado law professor Paul Campos, author of The Diet Myth (published in hard-cover as The Obesity Myth), both take up this question, and they reach similar conclusions.
The prevalence of obesity in children and adolescents is increasing at an even greater rate than in their parents' generation.
traces the obesity epidemic through the lives of children, families, teachers, and researchers.
Researchers have observed that people who sleep less than 7 to 8 hours a night have elevated rates of obesity and diabetes.