Note

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Note

Debt instruments with initial maturities longer than one year and shorter than 10 years.

Note

A debt security with a maturity longer than one year but less than 10 years. Because of many investors' aversion to long-term investments, notes are becoming more prominent benchmarks of the bond market. A prominent example is the 10-year Treasury note.

note

1. A written promise to pay a specific sum of money on a certain date. Also called promissory note.
2. See footnote.

Note.

A note is a debt security that promises to pay interest during the term that the issuer has use of the money, and to repay the principal on or before the maturity date.

For US Treasury securities, a note is an intermediate-term obligation -- as opposed to a short-term bill or a long-term bond -- that matures in two, three, five, or ten years from its issue date.

note

See promissory note.

Note

A document that evidences a debt and a promise to repay.

A mortgage loan transaction always includes a note evidencing the debt, and a mortgage evidencing the lien on the property.

References in periodicals archive ?
Noting the presence of IRS staff charged with reducing taxpayer burden, Mr.
Adams stated that the IRS recognizes that the new form may require systems changes, noting that the IRS is trying to build upon existing systems and software for tracking financial information.
Trager stated that the lack of instructions for the Schedule M-3 could hamper efforts to comment on the proposal, noting that the lack of definition of a restatement is causing some concern.
Norton referred to the advance pricing agreement (APA) program, noting the request from Senators Grassley and Baucus of the Senate Finance Committee for more than 400 APAs and their underlying documentation, the names of all professionals employed by the APA unit in the last 10 years, and a summary of all disciplinary actions brought against APA and competent authority personnel for the last three years.
He offered TEI's assistance in reviewing any guidance on the issue, noting that the system should encourage companies, as good corporate citizens, to participate in such campaigns.
Burke agreed, noting that especially with respect to indirect activities, companies are at a loss to determine what costs are subject to the disallowance.
DeLuca then referred to the five-percent de minimis rule set forth in the proposed regulations, noting that a higher figure will lessen the recordkeeping requirements by keeping companies from inadvertently "tripping over" the threshold.
Burke stated that the lack of final regulations is holding up audits, noting that the examining agents (as well as taxpayers) are disturbed by the lack of finality.