Drop

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Drop

Refers to over-the-counter trading. Remove from OTC trading list; hence, no longer making a market in a security.

Drop

To remove a security from a list of securities for which a dealer serves as a counterparty in the over-the-counter market.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the hammer spur is pushed up, the nose drops into the firing position.
At the end of the interviewing period, people got nose drops that contained either cold or flu viruses.
There are updated sections on the types of vaccines currently available (killed, modified-live and recombinant) and routes of administration (by injection, as nose drops and transdermally, using a specially designed administration device), immune responses to vaccination (including information on the duration of immunity that a vaccine induces), laboratory tests to predict immunity and the need for booster vaccination, applicable legal and regulatory considerations, and adverse events and reporting.
If you are using any nose drops or nasal sprays, check with your doctor about a different treatment.
Children were concurrently treated with ibuprofen, a decongestant, and saline nose drops. They were also given an antihistamine, although this class of drugs was shown to be ineffective more than 20 years ago and were recently shown to extend the duration of middle-ear effusion.
Your dentist can advise further, but ensure you take antihistamines for your allergies, and nose drops for sinus drip.
A flu vaccine which is administered through nose drops and could be suitable for young children is being developed and Dr Black's research could also be used to support arguments for or against introducing it.
Nose drops and mild painkillers are often prescribed for young children, as occasionally are antibiotics, depending on the cause.
The investigators administered a small, medically approved dose of cocaine nose drops to 15 healthy cocaine-naive study participants.
The reason is that prolonged use of drops with a vessel-shrinking agent, usually epinephrine, causes a rebound vessel dilation much as what occurs with chronic use of certain nose drops. This does not occur with Visine Tears."
Anderson suspects that physicians using InstyMeds will invest only in prescriptions that they'll need the most, such as antibiotics and ear and nose drops. They'll leave the less-frequently prescribed, possibly more expensive drugs for the pharmacist to stock.