standardization

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standardization

  1. the limitation of a firm's product and component range as a means of controlling production and marketing costs. By limiting the PRODUCT RANGE a firm can mass-produce each product and achieve ECONOMIES OF SCALE through long production runs, but forgoes potential sales by serving only a limited number of market segments. However it may be possible to cut production costs while maintaining product VARIETY through standardization and interchangeability of components. Standardization serves to reduce the variety of finished product stocks or materials and component stocks held, simplifying purchasing and STOCK CONTROL. Compare CUSTOMIZATION.
  2. see ORGANIZATION.

standardization

the limitation of a firm's product range as a means of achieving low-cost production and marketing. By restricting its product range, a firm may be able to mass-produce each product and secure ECONOMIES OF SCALE through long production runs. In reducing its product range, however, the firm may forgo greater sales and profit potential by limiting the number of MARKET SEGMENTS its products are sold in. Thus, as part of their PRODUCT DIFFERENTIATION policies, firms often need to ‘trade off cost and VARIETY considerations.
References in periodicals archive ?
a) the dialect writer's regional, social, linguistic, and educational background; additionally, whenever possible, the researcher should collect information concerning "(1) the writer's firsthand acquaintance with the speech ways and lifestyle of the folk whose nonstandard speech he or she portrays and (2) the writer's degree of exposure to other varieties, either regional or social" (Pable--Dylewski 2007: 155-156).
Government child care assistance may reduce child care problems for nonstandard hour workers by offering more resources to afford child care during nonstandard hours, but prior research suggests that nonstandard-hour workers use more informal child care arrangements (FFN) than standard-hour workers and, therefore, are less likely to receive child care assistance.
The vast majority of scholarship on nonstandard shifts has been done in the US context, arguably a country with the most limited family and childcare policies of any industrialized country.
In Nonstandard Work: The Nature and Challenges of Changing Employment Arrangements, ed.
Best pointed out that nonstandard auto premiums often decline during recessions, with the lower premium adversely affecting profitability.
Reflecting this reality, 50 percent of children who lived with both parents had at least one who worked a nonstandard work schedule.
But when it comes to nonstandard shift work, a consistent schedule -- the same hours, on the same days each week -- appears to buffer the negative effects, according to Leibbrand's research.
In this section, stability and local truncation error of the nonstandard scheme (10) are examined.
An approvals engine constantly monitors answers to the questionnaire and routes only incomplete or nonstandard requests for review.
It states that "unless authorized by the FAA," when it is necessary to conduct an instrument approach, "each person must use a standard instrument approach procedure." The key word there is "standard." By classifying a procedure as nonstandard, a procedure requires authorization to fly.
In her opening essay, Gleason defines nonstandard employment as the employment of those hired under nonstandard arrangements "without a permanent connection to an employer." She recognizes that the term is broad and ambiguous, encompassing a large mix of different arrangements: part-time employment, hiring through temporary-help employment agencies; working as a self-employed consultant; leasing, contracting, or subcontracting employees from business service firms; multiple jobholding; working as a day laborer; and more.