Nonsmoker

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Nonsmoker

A person who does not use tobacco products. A nonsmoker is entitled to a lower premium on health and life insurance because of the medical risks associated with tobacco.
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The comparison of various components of normal ECG analysis between smokers and non-smokers of the control group is described in Table 4.
It was observed that these embryos underwent late cleavage in time-lapse and that chromosomal structure and numerical defects and translocations such as 45, X/46, XY/47 and XXY were detected in 41 out of 120 embryos of fifteen patients with prolongation in the tPNf and t2 phases in time-lapse in the non-smoker group.
The mean age of onset of psychotic illness for the non-smokers was 24.
Interestingly, non-smokers who later found a job after the 12-month period receive an average of $5 per hour above the smokers' pay.
As the difference of weight among non-smokers and light-smokers is negative (light smokers are also light weight), the statistical outcome could be internally compensatory.
Specifically high level of impulsivity of smoker students is inversely correlated with the CGPA of non-smokers.
05 ( ANI ): A new study has revealed that smokers feel more tired, are less physically active, lack motivation and are more likely to suffer symptoms of anxiety and depression, when compared to their non-smoker counterparts.
The new research, conducted at the Harefield Hospital in north-west London where Professor Sir Magdi Yacoub performed the first heart and lung transplant in 1983, looked for any differences, including short-and medium-term survival, between patients given lungs from smokers and those who had organs from non-smokers.
However, you need to make sure that you have not smoked or used any Nicotine replacement products for at least 12 months to be classified as a non-smoker.
Non-smokers were patients who reported that they had never smoked.
Dr Tom Heffernan and Dr Terence O'Neil, both researchers at the Collaboration for Drug and Alcohol Research Group at Northumbria University, compared a group of current smokers with two groups of non-smokers.