new public management


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new public management

a new approach to the administration and delivery of public services which has found favour in the UK and elsewhere in the last fifteen years, and can be contrasted with ‘old’ public administration. Its hallmark is greater emphasis on private sector styles of management and efficiency. Large public bureaucracies with centralized decision-making have been broken up into smaller units with each unit operating at ‘arms-length’ from each other on the basis of explicit contracts, as in UK central government (see AGENCY STATUS) and the health service. These contracts typically include a range of output targets, and the organizations' achievement of these is measured by a set of PERFORMANCE INDICATORS. Competitive pressures have been increased in these organizations by the use of COMPETITIVE TENDERING which in some cases has resulted in private sector firms taking over the delivery of public services. The rationale for these changes is that the costs of public service provision will be easier to identify and hence to reduce. Furthermore, the fragmentation of public organizations will facilitate flexibility, and hence make service delivery more effective and efficient. An important component of the new public management has been a new approach to industrial relations: PERFORMANCE-RELATED PAY has been increasingly adopted in place of standardized pay systems. Critics of new public management argue, however, that the emphasis on entrepreneurial styles of management could weaken the commitment of public sector employees to disinterested public service, and at the extreme encourage corruption. See also CITIZENS' CHARTER.
References in periodicals archive ?
In sync with global theoretical shifts, the new public management paradigm became rooted in the transformation discourse of the new South African state (Schwella 1991; Houston & Muthien 2000; Chipkin 2011).
Most of the reforms undertaken in various countries are generally described under NPM (New Public Management).
In the end of this review, I would like to say that this book is useful because it makes a complex analysis of some concepts like urban governance, New Public Management and urban management, and tries to explain the diferences between them.
Although it is a common knowledge by now that the so-called hierarchical governance model was dominant until the rise of the "good-old" New Public Management in the early '90s, it would be a mistake if we were to dismiss the existence of substantial elements of the market and network philosophies of the past.
The starting point of New Public Management was in 1991, when Christopher Hood' wrote the article "A Public Management for all Seasons".
It is clear that, over the course of the last 16 years, local and community justice have wrestled for space with, and sometimes against, the competing trends of new public management and marketisation.
Private sector management theory--notably the work of Drucker--had an influence on new public management outside economic theory.
(2005) 'New Public Management is Dead--Long Live Digital-Era Governance', Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory, vol.
Putting the Public First is a classic statement of neo-liberal free market orthodoxy in general, and its New Public Management prescription for restructuring the public sector in particular.
This shift was called as the new public management (NPM) by Hood (1995), although some countries such as Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, etc are successful pioneers of the NPM reform, this new reform has received its share of criticism regardless of the positive reinforcement it had on those countries which have successfully applied it.
Others were inspired by some kind of fashion to make governments more efficient and responsive known as New Public Management and who have been transforming the social security systems in most of the world (Askim, Christensen, Fimreite, and Laegreid, 20i0).
New Public Management reforms have put into question the traditional mode of governance that was based on the interplay of strong state regulation and academic self-governance.

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