agent

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Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
Preventing errors with neuromuscular blocking agents: Paralyzed by mistakes.
Effect of neuromuscular blocking agents on gas exchange in patients presenting with acute respiratory distress syndrome.
(181) One of the advocates, the president of the Northeastern Connecticut Animal Rescue, Inc., warned that pet shops may be tempted to use succinylcholine chloride, a neuromuscular blocking agent, and that animals would be paralyzed and "die[] of suffocation while fully conscious." (182) She continued: "Please do not assume that the phrase 'lethal injection' is adequate to prevent the animal's suffering.
Evaluation of a new routine diagnostic test for immunoglobulin E sensitization to neuromuscular blocking agents. Anesthesiology 2011; 114: 91-7.
In a previous study, 3 different neuromuscular blocking agents were applied locally to induce mydriasis in kestrels.
Post-operative Residual Curarization (PORC) was frequent in patients given long acting neuromuscular blocking agents. (1) Later studies have reported PORC even with intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents.
However, even with the best of intentions, dosage and timing of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) reversal with neostigmine can be extremely difficult, and in the context of fast-turnover surgery, potentially impossible (2).
Neuromuscular Blocking Agents: an Argument for Their Adequate Use
Sugammadex, which has a y-cyclodextrin structure, is used to reverse steroidal neuromuscular blocking agents. It has the highest affinity for rocuronium and to lesser degree for vecuronium and pancuronium (1).
The purpose of the present study was to evaluate intubating conditions and hemodynamic responses in healthy adult patients with favorable airway anatomy by doing intravenous induction of anaesthesia with midazolam, fentanyl, lignocaine and propofol without use of neuromuscular blocking agents. Two doses of fentanyl 2mcg/kg & 3mcg/kg were compared.
Although the effect in the clinical setting is small, anaesthetists should be aware of the interaction between neuromuscular blocking agents and local anaesthetics during combined general and epidural anaesthesia.
Twenty-five years ago a study published in this journal demonstrated that these clinical signs were inadequate for assessment of reversal of neuromuscular blocking agents (2).