agent

(redirected from neuromuscular blocking agent)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Agent

A party appointed to act on behalf of a principal entity or person. In context of project financing, refers to the bank in charge of administering the project financing.

Agent

A person who acts on behalf of an organization or another person. Agents have a fiduciary responsibility to act in the best interests of the principal. Common examples of agents include brokers and attorneys. See also: Agency theory, Agency problem, Agency costs.

agent

An individual or organization that acts on behalf of and is subject to the control of another party. For example, in executing an order to buy or sell a security, a broker is acting as a customer's agent.

Agent.

An agent is a person who acts on behalf of another person or institution in a transaction. For example, when you direct your stockbroker to buy or sell shares in your account, he or she is acting as your agent in the trade.

Agents work for either a set fee or a commission based on the size of the transaction and the type of product, or sometimes a combination of fee and commission.

Depending on the work a particular agent does, he or she may need to be certified, licensed, or registered by industry bodies or government regulators. For instance, insurance agents must be licensed in the state where they do business, and stockbrokers must pass licensing exams and be registered with NASD.

In a real estate transaction, a real estate agent represents the seller. That person may also be called a real estate broker or a Realtor if he or she is a member of the National Association of Realtors. A buyer may be represented by a buyer's agent.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the PRINCIPAL) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent generally has authority to act within broad limits in conducting business on behalf of his or her principal and has a basic duty to carry out the tasks involved with due skill and diligence.

An agent or broker acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding scale commission or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. A stockbroker, for example, acts on behalf of clients wishing to buy and sell financial securities; an estate agent acts as an intermediary between buyers and sellers of houses, offices, etc.; while an insurance broker negotiates insurance cover on behalf of clients with an insurance company. A recruitment agency performs the services of advertising for, interviewing and selecting employees on behalf of a company. In addition to the role of agents as market intermediaries, organizational theorists have paid particular attention to the internal relationship between the employees (‘agents’) and owners (‘principals’) of a company See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY.

agent

a person or company employed by another person or company (called the principal) for the purpose of arranging CONTRACTS between the principal and third parties. An agent thus acts as an intermediary in bringing together buyers and sellers of a good or service, receiving a flat or sliding-scale commission, brokerage or fee related to the nature and comprehensiveness of the work undertaken and/or value of the transaction involved. Agents and agencies are encountered in one way or another in most economic activities and play an important role in the smooth functioning of the market mechanism. See PRINCIPAL-AGENT THEORY for discussion of ownership and control issues as they affect the running of companies. See ESTATE AGENT, INSURANCE BROKER, STOCKBROKER, DIVORCE OF OWNERSHIP FROM CONTROL.

agent

One who acts on behalf of a principal in an agency relationship. See agency for an extended discussion.

References in periodicals archive ?
The current AVMA guidelines do state that "[a] combination of pentobarbital with a neuromuscular blocking agent is not an acceptable euthanasia agent.
Refer to Table One for a sample list of neuromuscular blocking agents available in Canada.
Hypersensitive reactions to neuromuscular blocking agents may be due to nonspecific histamine release from mast cells [anaphylactoid reaction] or may be IgE mediated hypersensitive reactions [anaphylactic reaction]or may be due to high affinity to M2 muscarinic receptors leading to an augmented parasympathetic response to intubation causing severe bronchospasm mediated via M3 muscarinic receptors.
Postoperative residual curarization from intermediate-acting neuromuscular blocking agents delays recovery room discharge.
It must be remembered that the behaviour of the small muscles of the hand towards antidepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents may not be quantitatively identical with the behaviour of the other muscles.
RSI also has risks; using neuromuscular blocking agents has potential complications because of the removal of spontaneous respiratory effort and possibly the loss of airway patency under certain circumstances.
The costs of expensive items such as volatile agents, packed red cells, and neuromuscular blocking agents were underestimated whereas the costs of inexpensive items, such as plastic disposable equipment, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids and sedatives, were overestimated (Figure 1).
Especially troubling, according to ISMP, is the fact that most drugs involved in the shortages are high-alert medications that are more likely to cause serious patient harm when involved in an error (such as propofol, heparin, morphine, neuromuscular blocking agents and chemotherapy agents).
Neuromuscular blocking agents are commonly utilized as adjuvants to general anesthetics to facilitate ventilation, and in thoracic, orthopedic and intraocular surgeries, in this case to produce centralization of the eyeball (GLOVER & CONSTANTINESCU, 1997), keeping the cornea totally visible and thereby facilitating surgical procedures.
In the last issue neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA) were discussed in terms of availability and indications of use.
The neuromuscular order sheet listed several standardized neuromuscular blocking agents based on weight-based dosing and prompted clinicians to add on the pain and sedation pathways to ensure that adequate pain and sedation management were received.