Blockade

(redirected from neuromuscular blockade)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

Blockade

The act of preventing food, medicine, materials and/or other supplies from entering or leaving a country. A blockade occurs when one country sends its military and sets up a perimeter, disallowing the blockaded supplies from being exported or imported. A blockade is an act of war and is obviously disruptive to international trade.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Reply to letter: Continuous neuromuscular blockade is associated with decreased mortality in post-cardiac arrest patients-problems with the data.
Patients in group A recovered faster from initial bolus dose from neuromuscular blockade compared to group V.
Cisatracurium-induced neuromuscular blockade is affected by chronic phenytoin or carbamazepine treatment in neurosurgical patients.
Keywords: Atracurium, General anesthesia, Ideal body weight, Neuromuscular blockade.
Sugammadex has recently entered anaesthetic practice and is an agent that very rapidly and reliably reverses neuromuscular blockade caused by rocuronium and vecuronium.
Sugammadex, a selective reversa lmedication for preventing postoperative residual neuromuscular blockade. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2009; 7(4): CD007362.
Eastwood, "Optimal injection points for the neuromuscular blockade of forearm flexor muscles: A Cadaveric Study," Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics Part B, vol.
Prior to neuromuscular blockade, the CEEG was interpreted as continuous slowing or burst suppression (n = 11; Table 2).
This study proves that sugammadex is faster in reversing rocuronium-induced Neuromuscular Blockade compared to neostigmine [6].
The risk of mortality was 4.17-fold higher for patients submitted to continuous neuromuscular blockade and 6.66-fold higher for patients with dysautonomia.
[5] Four supramaximal stimuli were given before the injection of neuromuscular blockade and followed by every 30 s after the drug has been administered.
Since an anticholinesterase agent is used in anesthesiology practice to induce recovery of patients from neuromuscular blockade and, since blockers of [A.sub.2A] receptors are efficient to reduce the fades caused by cisatracurium when this agent is not causing drastic level of fades (Pereira et al., 2012), it is supposed that atropine is useful for initial recovery of patients from neuromuscular blockade caused by cisatracurium.