block

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Related to neuromuscular block: nondepolarizing agents

Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Roberts, "A randomized, dose-finding, phase II study of the selective relaxant binding drug, sugammadex, capable of safely reversing profound rocuronium-induced neuromuscular block," Anesthesia and Analgesia, vol.
It is important, therefore, to establish the degree of reversal of neuromuscular block, which is compatible with safe return to the ward, and it seems probable that this can be achieved using the train of four stimuli ...
Nevertheless, differentiating those selecting this reason for the use of monitoring could only reduce the numbers of practitioners objectively confirming full recovery from neuromuscular block.
Utilizing advanced electromyography (EMG) to quantify a patient's depth of neuromuscular block, TwitchView provides clinicians with reliable and accurate real-time data to support drug dosing decisions and reversal timing, helping prevent residual neuromuscular blockade.
Evaluation of neuromuscular block at the laryngeal, diaphragm and masseter muscles [4] is done by monitoring adductor pollicis, but it was not useful as the diaphragm recovers faster than hand muscles after succinylcholine.
(12.) Pietraszewski P Gaszynski T Residual neuromuscular block in elderly patients after surgical procedures under general anaesthesia with rocuronium.
The effect of different stages of neuromuscular block on the bispectral index and the bispectral index-XP under remifentanil/propofol anesthesia.
Some authors suggest avoiding neostigmine and to simply allow the neuromuscular block to wear off.