Nest Egg

(redirected from nest eggs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

Nest Egg

A reserve of money set aside, especially for a specific purpose. Generally speaking, a nest egg refers to savings for a major expense, such as retirement. However, it may also refer to smaller expenses that nonetheless require savings. Examples of the latter include nest eggs for vacations or down payments for a house.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
So what's going to happen next, can you afford to take any chances with your nest egg? How does it appear to be shaping up for your money and your family?
To keep 65-plus investors from "going into a shell" and keep them in the market if their nest egg demands it--and it frequently does--Fydroski often recommends, particularly for older seniors, a managed growth portfolio built with enough upside potential to provide solid, steady growth, but with a conservative downside risk-management strategy.
In less than 10 years the retirement nest egg has dwindled to $45,000.
People in the 18 to 24 age group were most likely to prioritise their social life over saving or investing money, with 27 per cent saying going out was more important than building a nest egg, while 17 per cent of 25 to 34-year-olds would also rather socialise than save.
"But the biggest worry of some executives is how to spend the nest egg they have accrued."
Since then PS6.1billion has been taken from nest eggs. The Government has called the result a "revolution".
3497, would allow workers to grow their nest eggs through a voluntary personal account while guaranteeing promised benefits, regardless of the account's investment performance.
Equally unacceptable is our councillors' reported intent to press for new allowances, to be backdated to 1999, which would net councillors nest eggs of thousands of pounds, courtesy of Cardiff rate payers.
'Many young people want to cash in nest eggs when they are about 25, when they need the money to buy their first home,' said Ms Lavin.
From my perspective as a retirement fund director, I believe mismanagement will lead to serious concern on the part of retirees, who never contemplated their nest eggs carrying the weight of the nation's bridges and roadways.
The Saving Britain data suggests people are saving - more than 60 per cent put money away since August - but they are not leaving their nest eggs alone, the building society said.
For some, stocks and bonds helped round out retirement nest eggs.