Feather One's Nest

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Feather One's Nest

Informal; to take advantage of one's authority to make money for oneself, especially using unethical or illegal means. For example, a bureaucrat may feather his nest by taking bribes from companies that he regulates.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, because always on is critical when it comes to home security, the Un-carrier was selected as the exclusive cellular backup connectivity provider for Nest Secure.
The source Bloomberg spoke with also said the company was working on an "end-to-end" security home system, much like traditional alarm systems but the Nest version would link up with your smartphone.
A number of factors have been observed affecting the clutch size like latitudinal variation (Hussell, 1972), egg laying date (Perrins and McCleery 1989), predation rate (Doligez and Clobert 2003), food availability (Lack 1947, Cody 1966, Hussell and Quinney 1987), habitat type (Kilpi and Lindstrom 1997), floor area of nest (Moller et al.
Once a nest was found, we recorded species and nest location using a hand-held Garmin GPS (Model: eTrex Legend H.
Between 1904 and 2013, only 13 nests were found in northern Alaska; nine nests were found in the egg stage and two in the chick stage, and nest stage at the remaining two nests was unknown (Felis et al.
Apparently, the nestling was 1 of 2 Black Swift nestlings that were collected by a teenage boy on 15 August from a single nest located 4.
Further, Starlings make use of a variety of nest sites (Kessell 1957; Feare 1984).
He adds: "As well as providing a suitable nest boxes provide an ideal opportunity to record the progress eggs and young.
They can predate turtle nests by destroying the nest and removing eggs.
Nesting birds employ a range of anti-predator strategies including crypsis (hiding the nest and its contents) and active defence, including aggression and distraction (Byrkjedal 1989; Geering et al.
Studies of the nesting ecology of populations in Florida and Louisiana suggest females prefer to nest in open patches that receive direct sunlight for some portion of the day (Woosley, 2005; Ewert et al.