Feather One's Nest

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Feather One's Nest

Informal; to take advantage of one's authority to make money for oneself, especially using unethical or illegal means. For example, a bureaucrat may feather his nest by taking bribes from companies that he regulates.
References in periodicals archive ?
Google has chosen to price the Nest Hub smart display at Rs 9,999.
The nest, reports indicate, costs from $2,500 (Sh250,000) to $10,000 (Sh1 million) per kilogramme.
In general, birds' ability to predict nest site quality has been considered important because the nest site strongly influences nest predation risk (Ricklefs 1969).
The vegetation structure and species composition of our nest-monitoring plots was highly heterogeneous within and between sites because of differences in disturbance history, management prescriptions, and terrain, thus allowing us to investigate nest survival across a range of habitats spanning the vegetation gradient from open-canopy savanna, to woodland, to forest.
Cambodia Bird's Nest Federation president Nang Sothy said there were up to 3,000 swiftlet nest farms across the country in 2014.
For most species of birds, nest predation is probably the most common cause of nest failure (Goodnow and Reitsma, 2011).
Asian hornet nests are generally spherical in shape and light brown in colour, and in daylight hours will be busy with Asian hornets flying to and from the nest and visible around the outside of it.
House wrens will build their nests in almost any enclosed space.
For each nest, we recorded the clutch size and estimated nest age based on the number of eggs and when clutch was complete.
The source Bloomberg spoke with also said the company was working on an "end-to-end" security home system, much like traditional alarm systems but the Nest version would link up with your smartphone.
A mockingbird, an owl, a sparrow, and a woodpecker each nested in a different tree.
In this study we examined numerous habitat, land use, and nest-site variables that potentially contribute to nest survival of western wood-pewees in two of their common habitats: riparian areas and Gambel oak woodlands in southwestern Colorado from 1992-1998 and in 2001 and 2004.