block

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Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
The team randomly assigned 157 adults to receive one of two options three minutes prior to the peripheral nerve block: either an injection of 1-2 mg of midazolam, or a pair of noise-canceling headphones playing Marconi Union's 'Weightless' an eight-minute song, created in collaboration with sound therapists, with carefully arranged harmonies, rhythms, and bass lines designed specifically to calm listeners down.
4% Articaine buccal infiltration versus 2% lidocaine inferior alveolar nerve block for emergency root canal treatment in mandibular molars with irreversible pulpitis: a randomized clinical study.
Nerve blocks such as ileo-inguinal or ileohypogastric, relieve somatic pain, some randomized controlled trials have shown that local anesthetic injection around small incision sites reduces postoperative somatic pain but is inadequate for visceral pain.
Specific nerve blocks may be used for the management of neuropathic pain and have a beneficial effect on opioid dose reduction.
When carrying out root canal treatments, the primary aim of the dentist is to achieve adequate local anesthesia.1 When treating mandibular molars the standard approach to achieve localized numbness is to administer an inferior alveolar nerve block.2
Currently, lower limb surgeries are mainly anesthetized by general anesthesia, nerve block and intravertebral anesthesia.8 Although general anesthesia works quickly and allows easy intraoperative management, the postoperative recovery and quality of life of geriatric patients may be severely affected due to considerable changes of hemodynamics, increased sensitivity to anesthetics, decelerated metabolism and cardiovascular stress response.
In more refractory and severe cases, nerve blocks should be performed.
We found that there was no statistically significant difference between TAP and II-IH blocks in the numeric pain rating score both at rest and at movement for the first postoperative 24 hours, but the II-IH nerve block significantly reduced total tramadol consumption and prolonged the time for the first analgesic request.