Geek

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Geek

Informal and somewhat derogatory; a new hire at a Wall Street trading firm. The term was popularized by the book Liar's Poker, which describes the author's experience as a bond trader on Wall Street in the 1980s.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because of submarines' shortage of library space and low levels of internet connectivity, the NGLP decided to send NeRDs to those ships first, which have about 110-160 crew members.
One of our nerd sisters, searching for photos to illustrate a diverse range of people, discovered this on a website: "Photographs of women wearing glasses, while not rare, are certainly unique.
According to its first definition of the word, a nerd is a "foolish or contemptible person who lacks social skills or is boringly studious.
He does a smart and sympathetic job of showing how the rules and elaborate procedures of computer programming, ham radio and other nerd pursuits provide the structure and sense of belonging missing from the lives of so many nerds.
Film nerds increasingly despise Shyamalan, though, because his sketchy "Twilight Zone"-style plot devices--such as space invaders who can span the unfathomable void between the stars but have to communicate with each other using crop circles strike these overgrown adolescents as fundamentally childish.
MEET a new breed of spy - a socially awkward computer nerd who hasn't had a hot date since he was at university.
At the University of British Columbia, our interdisciplinary research team, NERD (Norms Evolving in Response to Dilemmas), has developed a web-based survey instrument to address some of the challenges faced by traditional modes of public consultation.
The Nerd awards also saw another piece of silverware added to The Angel of the North's trophy cabinet, with David Bunce, director of culture and communities at Gateshead Council, collecting the award for Best North East Landmark.
Although the term nerd had many negative connotations, the term geek was even more potent.