Neo-Liberalism

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Neo-Liberalism

A political philosophy that favors free trade, globalization, and openness to the free market. The term is used frequently in an international context, but it may also refer to the politics of a single country. Neo-liberalism advocates floating exchange rates, the reduction or elimination of tariffs, privatization of nationalized companies, and similar practices. International organizations well-known for advocating neo-liberal policies include the International Monetary Fund and the World Trade Organization.
References in periodicals archive ?
We gladly acknowledge that neoliberalism is not conceptually neat and cannot be defined by a set of necessary and sufficient conditions for its use--a problem, if it is a problem, that neoliberalism shares with many other "essentially contested concepts," such as conservatism, individualism, and democracy.
The period since 1998 constitutes the third phase of neoliberalism in Turkey.
One wonders, if there are still tensions in this union of neoliberalism and authoritarianism, tensions that can be strategically exploited by the reconceptualized left that Giroux compellingly imagines.
He shows how neoliberalism dominates global institutions, breeds inequality and individualism and suppresses a sense of community.
Why Voice Matters: Culture and Politics after Neoliberalism.
In this essay, we adopt a similar position to Hingstman and Goodnight by suggesting that current debates over neoliberalism and Keynesianism in public culture obfuscate what is truly in the interest of the common good.
With the rise of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan, neoliberalism came to govern how policies were designed and institutions constructed.
There are numerous accounts of how to tackle neoliberalism due, in part, to the ghostly character of the phenomenon itself.
Neoliberalism has conned us into fighting climate change as individuals.
As neoliberalism has become a dominant international economic regime since the 1970s, African youth are not solely engaging with national policies as they once were during the continent's optimistic post-independence era.
As Stuart Hall pointed out in 'The neoliberal revolution' (see note 1), we have seen a number of different phases of neoliberalism in Britain since Thatcherism.
Indeed, both neoliberalism and Islamism use multiculturalism (i.